Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

Indexed in: ESCI, Scopus, PubMed,
PubMed Central, CAS, DOAJ, KCI
FREE article processing charge
OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Author index
Search
Eun-Jin Cheon 4 Articles
Solar retinopathy related to antidepressant use in a patient with major depressive disorder: a case report
Eun-Jin Cheon
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2024;41(3):228-232.   Published online May 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2024.00213
  • 767 View
  • 15 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This case report is a unique case of solar retinopathy following antidepressant-induced mydriasis and highlights the need for comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation in patients treated with medications having mydriatic effects. A 49-year-old female patient who had received long-term antidepressant therapy presented with bilateral visual impairment after prolonged sun exposure. Fundoscopy confirmed solar retinopathy, which was attributed to drug-induced mydriasis. Medication adjustments and sun protection strategies led to full visual recovery, underscoring the importance of interdisciplinary awareness. This case emphasizes the challenges associated with the simultaneous management of psychiatric and ophthalmic conditions and highlights the need for routine ophthalmic evaluation of patients prescribed antidepressants with reported ocular side effects.
The characteristics of elderly suicidal attempters in the emergency department in Korea: a retrospective study
Ji-Seon Jang, Wan-Seok Seo, Bon-Hoon Koo, Hey-Geum Kim, Seok-Ho Yun, So-Hey Jo, Dae-Seok Bai, Young-Gyo Kim, Eun-Jin Cheon
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2024;41(1):30-38.   Published online December 29, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.01004
  • 1,072 View
  • 58 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Although Korea ranks first in the suicide rate of elderly individuals, there is limited research on those who attempt suicide, with preventive measures largely based on population-based studies. We compared the demographic and clinical characteristics of elderly individuals who attempted suicide with those of younger adults who visited the emergency department after suicide attempts and identified the factors associated with lethality in the former group.
Methods
Individuals who visited the emergency department after a suicide attempt from April 1, 2017, to January 31, 2020, were included. Participants were classified into two groups according to age (elderly, ≥65 years; adult, 18–64 years). Among the 779 adult patients, 123 were elderly. We conducted a chi-square test to compare the demographic and clinical features between these groups and a logistic regression analysis to identify the risk factors for lethality in the elderly group.
Results
Most elderly participants were men, with no prior psychiatric history or suicide attempts, and had a higher prevalence of underlying medical conditions and attributed their attempts to physical illnesses. Being sober and planning suicide occurred more frequently in this group. In the elderly group, factors that increased the mortality rate were biological male sex (p<0.05), being accompanied by family members (p<0.05), and poisoning as a suicide method (p<0.01).
Conclusion
Suicide attempts in elderly individuals have different characteristics from those in younger adults and are associated with physical illness. Suicides in the former group are unpredictable, deliberate, and fatal. Therefore, tailored prevention and intervention strategies addressing the characteristics of those who are elderly and attempt suicide are required.
Hypertension and cognitive dysfunction: a narrative review
Eun-Jin Cheon
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(3):225-232.   Published online November 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00605
  • 3,537 View
  • 185 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Cognitive dysfunction is relatively less considered a complication of hypertension. However, there is sufficient evidence to show that high blood pressure in middle age increases the risk of cognitive decline and dementia in old age. The greatest impact on cognitive function in those with hypertension is on executive or frontal lobe function, similar to the area most damaged in vascular dementia. Possible cognitive disorders associated with hypertension are vascular dementia, Alzheimer disease, and Lewy body dementia, listed in decreasing strength of association. The pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with hypertension includes brain atrophy, microinfarcts, microbleeds, neuronal loss, white matter lesions, network disruption, neurovascular unit damage, reduced cerebral blood flow, blood-brain barrier damage, enlarged perivascular damage, and proteinopathy. Antihypertensive drugs may reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Given the high prevalence of dementia and its impact on quality of life, treatment of hypertension to reduce cognitive decline may be a clinically relevant intervention.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Chronic Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Decline in Patients with Cardiac Disease: Evidence, Relevance, and Therapeutic Implications
    Jan Traub, Anna Frey, Stefan Störk
    Life.2023; 13(2): 329.     CrossRef
  • The A-to-Z factors associated with cognitive impairment. Results of the DeCo study
    María Gil-Peinado, Mónica Alacreu, Hernán Ramos, José Sendra-Lillo, Cristina García, Gemma García-Lluch, Teresa Lopez de Coca, Marta Sala, Lucrecia Moreno
    Frontiers in Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Apathy syndrome in a patient previously treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression
Hye-Geum Kim, Bon-Hoon Koo, Seung Woo Lee, Eun-Jin Cheon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2019;36(3):249-253.   Published online March 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00150
  • 14,214 View
  • 167 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
There is considerable overlap in the clinical presentations of apathy and depression. However, differential diagnosis between apathy and other psychiatric conditions, including depression and dementia, is important. In this report, we present the case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment for depression. Differential diagnosis between treatment-resistant depression and SSRI-induced apathy syndrome was required. The symptoms of her apathy syndrome were relieved after the discontinuation of SSRIs and the addition of olanzapine, methylphenidate, and modafinil. Furthermore, we briefly review related literature in this article.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Apathy associated with antidepressant drugs: a systematic review
    Vasilios G. Masdrakis, Manolis Markianos, David S. Baldwin
    Acta Neuropsychiatrica.2023; 35(4): 189.     CrossRef
  • Can antidepressant use be associated with emotional blunting in a subset of patients with depression? A scoping review of available literature
    Muhammad Youshay Jawad, Maurish Fatima, Umer Hassan, Zaofashan Zaheer, Muhammad Ayyan, Muhammad Ehsan, Muhmmad Huzaifa Ahmed Khan, Ahsan Qadeer, Abdul Rehman Gull, Muhammad Talha Asif, Mujeeb U. Shad
    Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the efficiency of various antidepressant replacement regimens in the development of SSRI-induced apathy syndrome
    V. E. Medvedev, R. A. Kardashyan, V. I. Frolova, A. M. Burno, S. V. Nekrasova, V. I. Salyntsev
    Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Psychosomatics.2020; 12(2): 48.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science