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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Geu Ru Hong 8 Articles
Severe chest pain with mid-ventricular obstruction in a patient with hyperthyroidism
Jong Ho Nam, Jang Won Son, Geu Ru Hong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(1):128-131.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.1.128
  • 1,860 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Mid-ventricular obstruction (MVO) rarely occurs in patients without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Increased cardiac contractility may play an important role in causing MVO. We experienced a case of severe chest pain and MVO in a 50-year-old female patient. She had hypertension, diabetes, stroke and peripheral artery disease. Her blood pressure was very high (222/122 mmHg) with severe fluctuation. The transthoracic echocardiography revealed MVO accompanied by hyper-dynamic left ventricular systolic function. We regarded her chest pain and MVO as secondary findings related to other diseases. Coronary angiography and several tests for uncontrolled hypertension were performed, and those evaluations revealed that she had coronary artery disease and hyperthyroidism. We considered that the increase in the myocardial oxygen demand in response to the increase in cardiac contractility and workload associated with hyperthyroidism aggravated her symptoms and MVO. She was treated with methimazole and beta blockers and her symptoms dramatically improved.
Successful emergency transcatheter aortic valve implantation.
Jung Hee Lee, Ah Young Ji, Young Ju Kim, Changho Song, Moo Nyun Jin, Sun Wook Kim, Myeong Ki Hong, Geu Ru Hong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2014;31(2):144-147.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2014.31.2.144
  • 1,883 View
  • 9 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite the necessity of surgical aortic valve replacement, many patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) cannot undergo surgery because of their severe comorbidities. In these high-risk patients, percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can be safely accomplished. However, no study has shown that TAVI can be performed for patients with severe AS accompanied by acute decompensated heart failure. In this case report, 1 patient presented a case of severe pulmonary hypertension with decompensated heart failure after diagnosis with severe AS, and was successfully treated via emergency TAVI. Without any invasive treatment, acute decompensated heart failure with severe pulmonary hypertension is common in patients with severe AS, and it can increase mortality rates. In conclusion, TAVI can be considered one of the treatment options for severe as presented as acute decompensated heart failure patients with pulmonary hypertension.
A Case of Exceptionally Rapid Growing Cardiac Myxoma.
June Ho Bae, Jae Woong Choi, Geu Ru Hong, Sung Kee Ryu, Ji Young Park, Yu Min Jung, Jae Hoon Lee, Seung Kyu Choi
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2010;27(2):155-158.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2010.27.2.155
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Myxoma is the most common type of primary cardiac tumor and about 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart. Most myxomas are diagnosed by echocardiography. The growth rate of myxoma is clearly unknown and newly developed myxoma is difficult to understand clearly the onset of growth. We describe the case of a newly developed huge left atrial myxoma (7x7 cm)which showed no echocardiographic evidence of the tumor four years ago. Four years later the patient underwent transthoracic echocardiography due to preoperative evaluation that was normal. Nine months later, she presented with dyspnea. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a large mass located in left atrium. Pathology showed a myxoma that measured 7x7 cm implying a growth rate of 0.15x0.15 cm/month.
Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Apical Aneurysm and Thrombus Diagnosed by Contrast Echocardiography.
Kyu Hwan Park, Geu Ru Hong, Jong Ho Nam, Min Kyu Kang, Su Mi Kim, Seong Yoon Jung, Ji Hoon Na
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2010;27(2):133-138.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2010.27.2.133
  • 1,591 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is rare disease and a variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with prevalence of 1 in 500 in the general population. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with apical aneurysm and intramural thrombus is extremely rare. We report a case of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy progressing to left ventricular apical aneurysm with intramural thrombus diagnosed by contrast echocardiography.
A Case of Primary Unclassified Spindle Cell Sarcoma of the Left Atrium.
Jeong Hwan Cho, Geu Ru Hong, In Wook Song, Chang Woo Son, Sun Young Jung, Jong Ho Nam, Mi Jin Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2009;26(2):108-113.   Published online December 31, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2009.26.2.108
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  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Primary cardiac tumors are very uncommon. Seventy five percent of them are benign tumors and these are mostly myxomas. The malignant cardiac tumors, the majority of which are undifferentiated sarcomas, comprise up to 25% of all cardiac tumors. A primary malignant sarcoma of the myocardium is exceedingly rare. Thus, there have been very few such cases reported in the literature. We present here a case of a 15 year old man who had complaints of orthopnea and increasing exercise intolerance over a one month period. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a well demarcated huge mass with left ventricular inflow obstruction on the posterior wall of the left atrium. The patient's symptoms were relieved by surgery. The histological diagnosis was an unclassified spindle cell sarcoma.
Parasympathetic Modulation Plays a Key Role in Initiation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.
Won Jae Lee, Dong Gu Shin, Geu Ru Hong, Jong Sun Park, Young Jo Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):216-231.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.216
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
An acceleration or deceleration of the heart rate (HR), which reflects autonomic effects, is observed before the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). The purpose of this study was to assess the discrepancy in the autonomic interactions before the onset of PAF for different patterns of change in the HR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 105 Holter tapes with the PAF recorded, 55 episodes (42 patients, 34 men, 58+/-12 years) of PAF (>5 min), preceded by a sinus rhythm for more than 1 hour, were selected and submitted to time-domain and frequency-domain HR variability analyses. Fifty-five episodes were divided into 2 groups: group A PAF (n=30) with acceleration of the HR during the last 2 minutes before the PAF and group B (n=25) with deceleration of the HR. RESULTS: A significant linear decrease in the mean R-R interval was observed in group A (924+/-30 to 835+/-28 ms, P=0.001) and an increase from 831+/-32 to 866+/-31 ms in group B PAF episodes (P=0.046). In the frequency-domain analyses, the LF/HF ratio exhibited a progressive linear increase before the PAF in group A (P=0.005). The HF normalized units (HFnu) and natural logarithm-transformed HF (lnHF) values decreased from 30.8+/-4.0 to 16.1+/-1.8 (P=0.003) and 4.49+/-0.25 to 4.07+/-0.22 (P=0.001), respectively. Contrary to the results in group A, a significant increase in the HF components (HFnu and lnHF) (from 22.6+/-3.2 to 30.2+/-4.0, P=0.005, and 4.27+/-0.27 to 4.75 0.33, P=0.001, respectively) and a resultant decrease in the LF/HF ratio were observed in group B PAF episodes. No significant changes were observed in the LF components in either PAF group. CONCLUSION: Autonomic stimuli leading to an acceleration or deceleration of the HR before the onset of AF are due to parasympathetic modulation. Parasympathetic modulation plays a key role in the initiation of PAF
The Difference of Left Atrial Volume Index: Can It Predict the Occurrence of Atrial Fibrillation after Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Flutter?.
Ung Kim, Young Jo Kim, Sang Wook Kang, In Wook Song, Jung Hwan Jo, Sang Hee Lee, Geu Ru Hong, Jong Seon Park, Dong Gu Shin
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):197-205.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.197
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The occurrence of atrial fibrillation after ablation of atrial flutter is clinically important. We investigated variables predicting this evolution in ablated patients without a previous atrial fibrillation history. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients (Male=28) who were diagnosed as atrial flutter without previous atrial fibrillation history were enrolled in this study. Group 1 (n=11) was defined as those who developed atrial fibrillation after atrial flutter ablation during 1 year follow-up. Group 2 (n=25) was defined as those who has not occurred atrial fibrillation during same follow-up term. Echocardiogram was performed to all patients. We measured left atrial size, left ventricle end diastolic and systolic dimension, ejection fraction and left atrial volume index before and after ablation of atrial flutter. The differences of each variables were compared and analyzed between two groups. RESULTS: The preablation left ventricular ejection fraction (preLVEF) and postablation left ventricular ejection fraction (postLVEF) are 54+/-14%, 56+/-13% in group 1 and 47+/-16%, 52+/-13% in group 2. The differences between each two groups are statistically insignificant (2.2+/-1.5 in group 1 vs 5.4+/-9.8 in group 2, p=0.53). The preablation left atrial size (preLA) and postablation left atrial size (postLA) are 40+/-4 mm, 41+/-4 mm in group1 and 44+/-8 mm, 41+/-4 mm in group 2. The atrial sizes of both groups were increased but, the differences of left atrial size between two groups before and after flutter ablation were statistically insignificant (0.6+/-0.9mm in group 1 vs -3.8+/-7.4 mm in group 2, p=0.149). The left atrial volume index before flutter ablation was significantly reduced in group 1 than group 2 (32+/-10 mm3/m2, 35+/-10 mm3/m2 in group 1 and 32+/-10 mm3/m2, 29+/-8 mm3/m2 in group 2, p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The difference between left atrial volume index before and after atrial flutter ablation is the robust predictor of occurrence of atrial fibrillation after atrial flutter ablation without previous atrial fibrillation.
A Case of Glycogen Storage Disease with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Dong Hee Kim, Sang Wook Kang, Won Jong Park, Kyoung Ae Jang, Joon Hyuk Choi, Woong Kim, Sang Hee LEE, Geu Ru Hong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2006;23(2):252-257.   Published online December 31, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2006.23.2.252
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Glycogen storage diseases are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorder affecting multiple organ system: liver, skeletal muscle, heart and brain. Clinical features include: short status, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, dyslipidemia and rare involvement of the myocardium except in the case of type III, glycogen storage diseases with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in adult, which is extremely rare. We treated a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hepatomegaly that was unknown etiology. The patient was diagnosed as having glycogen storage disease. This 46-year old women was transferred with dyspnea on exertion and abnormal LFTs. She was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by echocardiography but there was no specific cause for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A liver biopsy was performed. The result showed glycogen storage disease possible type III, IV or IX. In conclusion, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology and abnormal LFTs should be evaluated for glycogen storage disease.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science