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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Communication
Some suggestions for pain physicians working in real-world clinical settings
Jung Hwan Lee, Min Cheol Chang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(Suppl):S123-S124.   Published online May 23, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00255
  • 932 View
  • 32 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Musculoskeletal pain is a common reason for patients visiting hospitals or clinics. Various therapeutic tools including oral medications, physical modalities, and procedures have been used to alleviate musculoskeletal pain. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted to demonstrate the therapeutic effect of each treatment and compare the efficacy of different protocols. These trials were conducted under controlled conditions with specific endpoints and timeframes, and the individual constraints of each patient were not considered. We believe that the findings of such studies may not accurately reflect clinical reality in real-world settings. In this article, we propose treatment principles for patients in pain clinics. We propose two principles for pain treatment: first, “Healing, in the end, is not healing.” and second, “The patient’s job is not a patient.” The main role of pain physicians is to quickly and actively reduce pain and help patients focus on their work and lives.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Protocol for lower back pain management: Insights from the French healthcare system
    Lea Evangeline Boyer, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Min Cheol Chang
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2024; 12(11): 1875.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of transcranial alternating current stimulation for controlling chronic pain: a systematic review
    Min Cheol Chang, Marie-Michèle Briand, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Seoyon Yang
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original articles
User perception of medical service robots in hospital wards: a cross-sectional study
Jung Hwan Lee, Jae Meen Lee, Jaehyun Hwang, Joo Young Park, Mijeong Kim, Dong Hwan Kim, Jae Il Lee, Kyoung Hyup Nam, In Ho Han
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(2):116-123.   Published online October 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01319
  • 4,780 View
  • 105 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Recently, there have been various developments in medical service robots (MSRs). However, few studies have examined the perceptions of those who use it. The purpose of this study is to identify user perceptions of MSRs.
Methods
We conducted a survey of 320 patients, doctors, and nurses. The contents of the survey were organized as follows: external appearances, perceptions, expected utilization, possible safety accidents, and awareness of their responsibilities. Statistical analyses were performed using t-test, chi-square test, and analysis of variance.
Results
The most preferred appearance was the animal type, with a screen. The overall average score of positive questions was 3.64±0.98 of 5 points and that of negative questions was 3.24±0.99. Thus, the results revealed that the participants had positive perceptions of MSR. The overall average of all expected utilization was 4.05±0.84. The most expected utilization was to guide hospital facilities. The most worrisome accident was exposure to personal information. Moreover, participants thought that the overall responsibility of the robot user (hospital) was greater than that of the robot manufacturer in the case of safety accidents.
Conclusion
The perceptions of MSRs used in hospital wards were positive, and the overall expected utilization was high. It is necessary to recognize safety accidents for such robots, and sufficient attention is required when developing and manufacturing robots.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Robotic Anesthesia: A Vision for 2050
    Thomas M. Hemmerling, Sean D. Jeffries
    Anesthesia & Analgesia.2024; 138(2): 239.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the influence of anthropomorphic appearance on usage intention on online medical service robots (OMSRs): A neurophysiological study
    Yi Ding, Ran Guo, Muhammad Bilal, Vincent G. Duffy
    Heliyon.2024; 10(5): e26582.     CrossRef
  • Customer acceptance of service robots under different service settings
    Yi Li, Chongli Wang, Bo Song
    Journal of Service Theory and Practice.2023; 33(1): 46.     CrossRef
Personal experience with microvascular decompression and partial sensory rhizotomy for trigeminal neuralgia
Jung Hwan Lee, Jae Meen Lee, Chang Hwa Choi
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(3):202-207.   Published online November 23, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00745
  • 7,737 View
  • 122 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a severe, paroxysmal pain in the distribution of the fifth cranial nerve. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is the most widely used surgical treatment for TN. We undertook this study to analyze the effects of and complications of MVD and to refine the surgical procedure for treating TN.
Methods
A total of 88 patients underwent for TN underwent surgery at our hospital. Among them, 77 patients underwent MVD alone, and 11 underwent partial sensory rhizotomy (PSR) with or without MVD. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively analyzed for patient characteristics, clinical results, offending vessels, and complications if any.
Results
The mean follow-up duration was 43.2 months (range, 3–216 months). The most common site of pain was V2+V3 territory (n=27), followed by V2 (n=25) and V3 (n=23). The most common offending vessels were the superior cerebellar artery and anterior inferior cerebellar artery in that order. The overall rate of postoperative complications was 46.1%; however, most complications were transient. There were two cases of permanent partial hearing disturbance. In the MVD alone group, the cure rate was 67.5%, and the improvement rate was 26.0%. Among 11 patients who underwent PSR with or without MVD, the cure rate was 50.0%, and the improvement rate was 30.0%.
Conclusion
The clinical results of MVD were satisfactory. Although the outcomes of PSR were not as favorable as those of pure MVD in this study, PSR can be considered in cases where there is no significant vascular compressive lesion or uncertainty of the causative vessel at the surgery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Revisiting the Efficacy of Redo Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia
    Zhongding Zhang, Hua Zhao, Yinda Tang, Baimiao Wang, Qing Yuan, Ying Zhang, Yihua Li, Jun Zhong, Shiting Li
    World Neurosurgery.2024; 186: e335.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review on the efficacy of adjunctive surgical strategies during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia without intraoperative evidence of neurovascular conflict
    Nicola Montano, Grazia Menna, Alessandra Musarra, Renata Martinelli, Alessandro Izzo, Quintino Giorgio D’Alessandris, Manuela D’Ercole, Alessandro Olivi
    Neurosurgical Review.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Progress in Surgical Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia
    滨 何
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2023; 13(02): 2313.     CrossRef
  • How Far Has Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation Come Along as a Treatment Procedure in Treating Trigeminal Neuralgia Patients?
    Stephen D Howard, Varun Soti
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Historical aspects of the problem of treatment of trigeminal neuralgia and the role of neurosurgical methods in its solution (literature review)
    A. N. Zhurkin, A. V. Semenov, V. A. Sorokovikov, N. V. Bartul
    Acta Biomedica Scientifica.2021; 6(4): 123.     CrossRef
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia: Current Approaches and Emerging Interventions
    Risheng Xu, Michael E Xie, Christopher M Jackson
    Journal of Pain Research.2021; Volume 14: 3437.     CrossRef
Computer-based clinical coding activity analysis for neurosurgical terms
Jong Hyuk Lee, Jung Hwan Lee, Wooseok Ryu, Byung Kwan Choi, In Ho Han, Chang Min Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2019;36(3):225-230.   Published online June 4, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00220
  • 5,723 View
  • 54 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
It is not possible to measure how much activity is required to understand and code a medical data. We introduce an assessment method in clinical coding, and applied this method to neurosurgical terms.
Methods
Coding activity consists of two stages. At first, the coders need to understand a presented medical term (informational activity). The second coding stage is about a navigating terminology browser to find a code that matches the concept (code-matching activity). Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine – Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) was used for the coding system. A new computer application to record the trajectory of the computer mouse and record the usage time was programmed. Using this application, we measured the time that was spent. A senior neurosurgeon who has studied SNOMED CT has analyzed the accuracy of the input coding. This method was tested by five neurosurgical residents (NSRs) and five medical record administrators (MRAs), and 20 neurosurgical terms were used.
Results
The mean accuracy of the NSR group was 89.33%, and the mean accuracy of the MRA group was 80% (p=0.024). The mean duration for total coding of the NSR group was 158.47 seconds, and the mean duration for total coding of the MRA group was 271.75 seconds (p=0.003).
Conclusion
We proposed a method to analyze the clinical coding process. Through this method, it was possible to accurately calculate the time required for the coding. In neurosurgical terms, NSRs had shorter time to complete the coding and higher accuracy than MRAs.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science