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Original article
Effect of pitavastatin on erythrocyte membrane fatty acid content in patients with chronic kidney disease: two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial
Minna Kim, Seong Eun Kim, Su Mi Lee, Won Suk An
Received January 26, 2024  Accepted April 2, 2024  Published online May 8, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2024.00094    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 858 View
  • 39 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Statins reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although diabetes mellitus (DM) is a reported side effect of statin treatment, some studies have indicated that pitavastatin does not cause DM. The present study investigated the effect of pitavastatin on the fatty acid (FA) content of erythrocyte membranes, which affects the occurrence of DM and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, changes in adiponectin and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were evaluated after pitavastatin treatment.
Methods
A total of 45 patients were enrolled, 28 of whom completed the study. Over 24 weeks, 16 patients received 2 mg pitavastatin and 12 patients received 10 mg atorvastatin. Dosages were adjusted after 12 weeks if additional lipid control was required. There were 10 and nine patients with DM in the pitavastatin and atorvastatin groups, respectively. Erythrocyte membrane FAs and adiponectin levels were measured using gas chromatography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively.
Results
In both groups, saturated FAs, palmitic acid, trans-oleic acid, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly lower than those at baseline. The arachidonic acid (AA) content in the erythrocyte membrane increased significantly in the pitavastatin group, but adiponectin levels were unaffected. HbA1c levels decreased in patients treated with pitavastatin. No adverse effects were associated with statin treatment.
Conclusion
Pitavastatin treatment in patients with CKD may improve glucose metabolism by altering erythrocyte membrane AA levels. In addition, pitavastatin did not adversely affect glucose control in patients with CKD and DM.
Focused Review articles
Management of diabetic foot ulcers: a narrative review
Jahyung Kim, Otgonsaikhan Nomkhondorj, Chi Young An, Ye Chan Choi, Jaeho Cho
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):335-342.   Published online September 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00682
  • 3,837 View
  • 294 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are among the most serious complications of diabetes and are a source of reduced quality of life and financial burden for the people involved. For effective DFU management, an evidence-based treatment strategy that considers the patient's clinical context and wound condition is required. This treatment strategy should include conventional practices (surgical debridement, antibiotics, vascular assessment, offloading, and amputation) coordinated by interdisciplinary DFU experts. In addition, several adjuvant therapies can be considered for nonhealing wounds. In this narrative review, we aim to highlight the current trends in DFU management and review the up-to-date guidelines.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Kick-Starting Wound Healing: A Review of Pro-Healing Drugs
    Bethany L. Patenall, Kristyn A. Carter, Matthew R. Ramsey
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2024; 25(2): 1304.     CrossRef
  • Sequence analysis of microbiota in clinical human cases with diabetic foot ulcers from China
    Ying Li, Li Zhang, Meifang He, Yuebin Zhao
    Heliyon.2024; 10(14): e34368.     CrossRef
  • Unveiling the challenges of diabetic foot infections: diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and rehabilitation
    Chul Hyun Park
    Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science.2023; 40(4): 319.     CrossRef
Management and rehabilitation of moderate-to-severe diabetic foot infection: a narrative review
Chi Young An, Seung Lim Baek, Dong-Il Chun
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):343-351.   Published online September 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00717
  • 2,269 View
  • 131 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Diabetic foot is one of the most devastating consequences of diabetes, resulting in amputation and possibly death. Therefore, early detection and vigorous treatment of infections in patients with diabetic foot are critical. This review seeks to provide guidelines for the therapy and rehabilitation of patients with moderate-to-severe diabetic foot. If a diabetic foot infection is suspected, bacterial cultures should be initially obtained. Numerous imaging studies can be used to identify diabetic foot, and recent research has shown that white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography has comparable diagnostic specificity and sensitivity to magnetic resonance imaging. Surgery is performed when a diabetic foot ulcer is deep and is accompanied by bone and soft tissue infections. Patients should be taught preoperative rehabilitation before undergoing stressful surgery. During surgical procedures, it is critical to remove all necrotic tissue and drain the inflammatory area. It is critical to treat wounds with suitable dressings after surgery. Wet dressings promote the formation of granulation tissues and new blood vessels. Walking should begin as soon as the patient’s general condition allows it, regardless of the wound status or prior walking capacity. Adequate treatment of comorbidities, including hypertension and dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation are necessary. Additionally, broad-spectrum antibiotics are required to treat diabetic foot infections.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Unveiling the challenges of diabetic foot infections: diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and rehabilitation
    Chul Hyun Park
    Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science.2023; 40(4): 319.     CrossRef
Original article
Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with the vitamin D pathway in the placentas of women with gestational diabetes mellitus: a laboratory study
Mi Ju Kim, Hyun Mi Kim, Hyun-Hwa Cha, Won Joon Seong
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(Suppl):S9-S16.   Published online May 8, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00150
  • 1,449 View
  • 58 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The aim of this study was to analyze the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes known to be involved in vitamin D metabolism in the placenta using the placental tissue of mothers diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to determine whether the SNPs and occurrence of GDM are related.
Methods
We enrolled 80 women of the same gestational age, 40 with and 40 without GDM. The placenta was obtained from each woman after delivery and SNP genotyping was performed on seven SNPs in the CYP27B1 (rs10877012), CYP24A1 (rs2248359, rs6013897, and rs2209314), and GC (rs2282679, rs16847024, and rs3733359) genes. Maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured during the first trimester of pregnancy and before delivery.
Results
At the time of delivery, vitamin D levels were lower (21.05±12.05 mg/dL vs. 31.31±20.72 mg/dL, p=0.012) and the frequency of vitamin D deficiency was higher (60.7% vs. 32.5%, p=0.040) in the GDM group. In women with GDM, the G allele of rs10877012 was more common (86.3% vs. 65.0%, p=0.002). The rs10877012 GG genotype was more common in the GDM group (72.5% vs. 42.5%, p=0.007) and the rs10877012 TT genotype was more common in the control group (12.5% vs. 0%, p=0.007).
Conclusion
Mothers with GDM have lower serum concentrations of vitamin D before delivery than healthy controls and vitamin D deficiency is common. A polymorphism in CYP27B1 (rs10877012), is considered to be a cause of GDM pathogenesis.
Communication
The art of diabetes care: guidelines for a holistic approach to human and social factors
Muhammad Jawad Hashim
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(2):218-222.   Published online November 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00577
  • 1,820 View
  • 79 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A holistic approach to diabetes considers patient preferences, emotional health, living conditions, and other contextual factors, in addition to medication selection. Human and social factors influence treatment adherence and clinical outcomes. Social issues, cost of care, out-of-pocket expenses, pill burden (number and frequency), and injectable drugs such as insulin, can affect adherence. Clinicians can ask about these contextual factors when discussing treatment options with patients. Patients’ emotional health can also affect diabetes self-care. Social stressors such as family issues may impair self-care behaviors. Diabetes can also lead to emotional stress. Diabetes distress correlates with worse glycemic control and lower overall well-being. Patient-centered communication can build the foundation of a trusting relationship with the clinician. Respect for patient preferences and fears can build trust. Relevant communication skills include asking open-ended questions, expressing empathy, active listening, and exploring the patient’s perspective. Glycemic goals must be personalized based on frailty, the risk of hypoglycemia, and healthy life expectancy. Lifestyle counseling requires a nonjudgmental approach and tactfulness. The art of diabetes care rests on clinicians perceiving a patient’s emotional state. Tailoring the level of advice and diabetes targets based on a patient’s personal and contextual factors requires mindfulness by clinicians.
Original articles
Association of advanced chronic kidney disease with diabetic retinopathy severity in older patients with diabetes: a retrospective cross-sectional study
Geun Woo Lee, Chul Ho Lee, Seong Gyu Kim
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(2):146-155.   Published online May 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00206
  • 2,827 View
  • 82 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Despite the recent increasing trend in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes among older individuals, the relationship between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in these patients remains unclear. This study investigated the severity of renal dysfunction according to the degree of DR in older patients with type 2 diabetes.
Methods
A total of 116 patients with diabetes and CKD stage ≥3 who visited both the nephrology and ophthalmology outpatient departments between July 2021 and January 2022 were screened. There were 53 patients in the no DR group, 20 in the nonproliferative DR (NPDR) group, and 43 in the proliferative DR (PDR) group.
Results
DR severity was related to the deterioration of renal function. The proportion of patients with advanced CKD significantly increased with DR severity (p for trend <0.001). In the multivariate regression model adjusted for age of ≥80 years, male sex, poorly controlled diabetes, macroalbuminuria, insulin use, diabetes duration of ≥10 years, cerebrovascular accident, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease history, the odds ratio compared with the no DR group was approximately 4.6 for the NPDR group and approximately 11.8 for the PDR group, which were both statistically significant (p=0.025 and p<0.001, respectively).
Conclusion
DR severity in older patients with diabetes may be associated with deterioration of renal function and high prevalence of advanced CKD. Therefore, periodic examination for DR in older patients with diabetes is important for predicting renal function deterioration and CKD progression.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diabetic Macular Edema Is Predictive of Renal Failure in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease
    Shih-Hsiang Ou, Wei-Che Chang, Ling-Ying Wu, Shiow-Ing Wang, James Cheng-Chung Wei, Po-Tsang Lee
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 109(3): 761.     CrossRef
  • Study on Correlation between Renal Function and Diabetic Retinopathy
    卓越 郑
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2024; 14(03): 513.     CrossRef
Increase in blood glucose level and incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus in the Daegu-Gyeongbuk area during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: a retrospective cross-sectional study
Mi Seon Lee, Rosie Lee, Cheol Woo Ko, Jung Eun Moon
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(1):46-52.   Published online August 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01221
  • 7,045 View
  • 97 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in the Daegu-Gyeongbuk area in 2020 has caused difficulties in the daily life and hospital care of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We detected an increase in blood sugar levels in these children and the number of patients hospitalized with more severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) compared to those before COVID-19.
Methods
This single-center study was conducted at Kyungpook National University Children’s Hospital. The following patient groups were included; 45 returning patients diagnosed with T1DM and undergoing insulin treatment for more than 2 years and 20 patients newly diagnosed with T1DM before and after COVID-19 were selected by age matching. Returning patients before and after the outbreak were selected, and changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were retrospectively reviewed. The HbA1c levels and severity of symptoms in newly diagnosed patients during hospitalization were examined.
Results
HbA1c levels in returning patients with T1DM were significantly increased after COVID-19 (before, 7.70%±1.38% vs. after, 8.30%±2.05%; p=0.012). There were 10 and 10 newly diagnosed patients before and after COVID-19, respectively. The proportion of patients with drowsiness and dyspnea at the time of admission was higher after COVID-19 than before (before, 2 of 10 vs. after, 4 of 10). The HbA1c levels were higher in newly diagnosed patients hospitalized after COVID-19 than before (before, 11.15% vs. after, 13.60%; p=0.036).
Conclusion
Due to COVID-19 in the Daegu-Gyeongbuk area, there was an increase in blood glucose levels in children with T1DM and in the incidence of severe DKA in newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidences of newly diagnosed childhood diabetes and onset severity: a multicenter regional study in Thailand over two decades and during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Pattharaporn Sinthuprasith, Karn Wejaphikul, Dolrutai Puttawong, Hataitip Tang-Ngam, Naphatsorn Sanrattana, Kevalee Unachak, Prapai Dejkhamron
    Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 37(6): 487.     CrossRef
  • Incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis during COVID-19 pandemic: a meta-analysis of 124,597 children with diabetes
    Anas Elgenidy, Ahmed K. Awad, Khaled Saad, Mostafa Atef, Hatem Helmy El-Leithy, Ahmed A. Obiedallah, Emad M. Hammad, Faisal-Alkhateeb Ahmad, Ahmad M. Ali, Hamad Ghaleb Dailah, Amira Elhoufey, Samaher Fathy Taha
    Pediatric Research.2023; 93(5): 1149.     CrossRef
  • Comments on Rahmati et al., The global impact of COVID‐19 pandemic on the incidence of pediatric new‐onset type 1 diabetes and ketoacidosis: A systematic review and meta‐analysis. J Med Virol. 2022; 1‐16 (doi: 10.1002/jmv.27996)
    Joachim Rosenbauer, Anna Stahl‐Pehe, Sabrina Schlesinger, Oliver Kuß
    Journal of Medical Virology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Children and Adolescents with New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes
    Clemens Kamrath, Alexander J. Eckert, Reinhard W. Holl, Joachim Rosenbauer, Andrea Scaramuzza
    Pediatric Diabetes.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Difficulties in differential diagnosis of carbohydrate metabolism disorders in patients with coronavirus infection in real clinical practice. Case report
    Tatyana N. Markova, Mukhamed S. Stas, Valentina V. Chibisova, Anastasia A. Anchutina
    Consilium Medicum.2023; 25(4): 241.     CrossRef
  • Endocrinological Involvement in Children and Adolescents Affected by COVID-19: A Narrative Review
    Valeria Calcaterra, Veronica Maria Tagi, Raffaella De Santis, Andrea Biuso, Silvia Taranto, Enza D’Auria, Gianvincenzo Zuccotti
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(16): 5248.     CrossRef
  • Glycemic control and complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents during the COVID-19 outbreak
    Kyeong Eun Oh, Yu Jin Kim, Ye Rim Oh, Eungu Kang, Hyo-Kyoung Nam, Young-Jun Rhie, Kee-Hyoung Lee
    Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023; 28(4): 275.     CrossRef
  • Incidence of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Among Pediatrics With Type 1 Diabetes Prior to and During COVID-19 Pandemic: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
    Osamah M. Alfayez, Kholood S. Aldmasi, Nada H. Alruwais, Nouf M. Bin Awad, Majed S. Al Yami, Omar A. Almohammed, Abdulaali R. Almutairi
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Initial Presentation of Pediatric Diabetes Before and During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic Era
    Yoonha Lee, Minseung Kim, Kyeongeun Oh, Eungu Kang, Young-Jun Rhie, Jieun Lee, Yong Hee Hong, Young-Lim Shin, Jae Hyun Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The global impact of COVID‐19 pandemic on the incidence of pediatric new‐onset type 1 diabetes and ketoacidosis: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Masoud Rahmati, Maryam Keshvari, Shahrzad Mirnasuri, Dong K. Yon, Seung W. Lee, Jae Il Shin, Lee Smith
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(11): 5112.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and diabetes: What do we know so far?
    Prakash Gangadaran, Himabindu Padinjarathil, Shri Hari Subhashri Rajendran, Manasi P Jogalekar, Chae Moon Hong, Baladhandapani Aruchamy, Uma Maheswari Rajendran, Sridharan Gurunagarajan, Anand Krishnan, Prasanna Ramani, Kavimani Subramanian
    Experimental Biology and Medicine.2022; 247(15): 1330.     CrossRef
  • Stress hyperglycemia, Diabetes mellitus and COVID-19 infection: The impact on newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes
    Ioanna Farakla, Theano Lagousi, Michael Miligkos, Nicolas C. Nicolaides, Ioannis-Anargyros Vasilakis, Maria Mpinou, Maria Dolianiti, Elina Katechaki, Anilia Taliou, Vasiliki Spoulou, Christina Kanaka-Gantenbein
    Frontiers in Clinical Diabetes and Healthcare.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Risk factors affecting amputation in diabetic foot
Jun Ho Lee, Ji Sung Yoon, Hyoung Woo Lee, Kyu Chang Won, Jun Sung Moon, Seung Min Chung, Yin Young Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):314-320.   Published online May 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00129
  • 6,724 View
  • 208 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
A diabetic foot is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (LEA). The study seeks to assess the risk factors of amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU).
Methods
The study was conducted on 351 patients with DFUs from January 2010 to December 2018. Their demographic characteristics, disease history, laboratory data, ankle-brachial index, Wagner classification, osteomyelitis, sarcopenia index, and ulcer sizes were considered as variables to predict outcome. A chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to test the relationship of the data gathered. Additionally, the subjects were divided into two groups based on their amputation surgery.
Results
Out of the 351 subjects, 170 required LEA. The mean age of the subjects was 61 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 15 years; there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of these averages. Osteomyelitis (hazard ratio [HR], 6.164; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.561−10.671), lesion on percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (HR, 2.494; 95% CI, 1.087−5.721), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.981−0.999), ulcer size (HR, 1.247; 95% CI, 1.107−1.405), and forefoot ulcer location (HR, 2.475; 95% CI, 0.224−0.73) were associated with risk of amputation.
Conclusion
Osteomyelitis, peripheral artery disease, chronic kidney disease, ulcer size, and forefoot ulcer location were risk factors for amputation in diabetic foot patients. Further investigation would contribute to the establishment of a diabetic foot risk stratification system for Koreans, allowing for optimal individualized treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy of Chinese and Western Medical Techniques in Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers With Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Lower Leg
    Yongchong Chen, Yunzhu Wang, TaiAn Zhang, Chao Meng, Qing Li, Bohui Zhang, Kai Zhang, Chunfang Qin
    The International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds.2024; 23(1): 70.     CrossRef
  • Classification of foot ulcers in people with diabetes: A systematic review
    Matilde Monteiro‐Soares, Emma J. Hamilton, David A. Russell, Gulapar Srisawasdi, Edward J. Boyko, Joseph L. Mills, William Jeffcoate, Fran Game
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Renal function is highly associated with podiatric risk in diabetic patients
    Jean-Baptiste Bonnet, Ilan Szwarc, Antoine Avignon, Sébastien Jugant, Ariane Sultan
    Clinical Kidney Journal.2023; 16(11): 2156.     CrossRef
  • Risk factor analysis for diabetic foot ulcer‐related amputation including Controlling Nutritional Status score and neutrophil‐to‐lymphocyte ratio
    Yandan Zhu, Hongtao Xu, Yuzhen Wang, Xia Feng, Xinyu Liang, Liying Xu, Zhiqiang Liang, Zhongjia Xu, Yawen Li, Yi Le, Manchen Zhao, Jianfei Yang, Ji Li, Yemin Cao
    International Wound Journal.2023; 20(10): 4050.     CrossRef
  • The association between estimated glomerular filtration rate and prognosis in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis
    Jinghang Zhang, Dong Chen, Xuemei Li, Min Ding, Jun Xu, Meijun Wang, Bai Chang
    International Wound Journal.2022; 19(7): 1650.     CrossRef
  • Renal Function Status in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Having Diabetic Foot Infection and Role of Antibiotics
    Shabab Hussain, . Arrham, Syeda Javeriya Saeed, Ahmad Murtaza Anwar, Asif Khan, Saifullah Brohi
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2022; : 189.     CrossRef
  • Re-understanding and focusing on normoalbuminuric diabetic kidney disease
    Na An, Bi-tao Wu, Yu-wei Yang, Zheng-hong Huang, Jia-fu Feng
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of curcumin intake on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled trial
    Mehrdad Mokhtari, Reza Razzaghi, Mansooreh Momen‐Heravi
    Phytotherapy Research.2021; 35(4): 2099.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Its Association With Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Community-Dwelling Asian Population
    Seung Min Chung, Jun Sung Moon, Min Cheol Chang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical outcomes among patients with chronic kidney disease hospitalized with diabetic foot disorders: A nationwide retrospective study
    Michael Salim
    Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review article
Maturity-onset diabetes of the young: update and perspectives on diagnosis and treatment
Kyung Mi Jang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(1):13-21.   Published online January 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00409
  • 13,541 View
  • 371 Download
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a clinically heterogeneous group of monogenic disorders characterized by ß-cell dysfunction. MODY accounts for between 2% and 5% of all diabetes cases, and distinguishing it from type 1 or type 2 diabetes is a diagnostic challenge. Recently, MODY-causing mutations have been identified in 14 different genes. Sanger DNA sequencing is the gold standard for identifying the mutations in MODY-related genes, and may facilitate the diagnosis. Despite the lower frequency among diabetes mellitus cases, a correct genetic diagnosis of MODY is important for optimizing treatment strategies. There is a discrepancy in the disease-causing locus between the Asian and Caucasian patients with MODY. Furthermore, the prevalence of the disease in Asian populations remains to be studied. In this review, the current understanding of MODY is summarized and the Asian studies of MODY are discussed in detail.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 7 (MODY7) and mutation in the Krüppel-like transcription factor 11 (KLF11) gene
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    Lăcrămioara Ionela Butnariu, Delia Andreia Bizim, Carmen Oltean, Cristina Rusu, Monica Cristina Pânzaru, Gabriela Păduraru, Nicoleta Gimiga, Gabriela Ghiga, Ștefana Maria Moisă, Elena Țarcă, Iuliana Magdalena Starcea, Setalia Popa, Laura Mihaela Trandafir
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    A.V. Garnytska, O.S. Orlyk, L.M. Zenkina, S.O. Osadcha
    Infusion & Chemotherapy.2024; (2): 32.     CrossRef
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    Na Zhang, Hui Zhao, Cui Li, Feng-Zhi Zhang
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    Hui-Xuan Wu, Tian-Yao Chu, Junaid Iqbal, Hong-Li Jiang, Long Li, Yan-Xuan Wu, Hou-De Zhou
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023; 108(11): 2970.     CrossRef
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    Maja Baretić, Domagoj Caban, Jadranka Sertić
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 13(7): 1063.     CrossRef
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    Jieying Liu, Ziyan Xie, Junling Fu, Miao Yu, Tong Wang, Cuijuan Qi, Peng Liu, Xiangyi Hui, Dongmei Wang, Lu Ding, Qian Zhang, Ting Xie, Xinhua Xiao
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Özlem Üstay, Tugçe Apaydın, Onur Elbasan, Hamza Polat, Gizem Günhan, Ceyda Dinçer, Lamia Şeker, Esra Arslan Ateş, Ayşegül Yabacı, Ahmet lter Güney, Dilek Gogas Yavuz
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  • Meta-analysis of HNF1A-MODY3 variants among human population
    Rachna Behl, Nishtha Malhotra, Vinay Joshi, Shruti Poojary, Sanniya Middha, Shalini Gupta, Arinola B. Olaonipekun, Ikechukwu Okoye, Bhushan Wagh, Dibyendu Biswas, Chukwuemelie Aginah, Bhavya Saini, Chinaza Nwanya, Sopuluchukwu Ugwu, Modupe M. Anthony, Xua
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    Ying Cheng, Da-Peng Zhong, Li Ren, Hang Yang, Chen-Fu Tian
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Mellitus: Focus on Mody-Diabetes
    K. A. Aitbaev, I. T. Murkamilov, Zh. A. Murkamilova, V. V. Fomin, I. O Kudaibergenova, F. A. Yusupov
    The Russian Archives of Internal Medicine.2022; 12(6): 430.     CrossRef
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    Kyung Mi Jang
    Precision and Future Medicine.2022; 6(4): 209.     CrossRef
  • Modeling Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young in Pluripotent Stem Cells: Challenges and Achievements
    Carmel Braverman-Gross, Nissim Benvenisty
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gençlerin Erişkin Başlangıçlı Diyabeti (MODY) Sorumlu HNF4A, GCK ve HNF1 Gen Varyasyonlarının Dünya Genelinde Coğrafik Dağılımı
    Deniz KANCA DEMİRCİ, Nurdan GÜL, İlhan SATMAN, Oguz OZTURK, Hülya YILMAZ AYDOĞAN
    Haliç Üniversitesi Fen Bilimleri Dergisi.2021; 4(1): 41.     CrossRef
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Original Article
Comparison of sevoflurane and propofol anesthesia on the incidence of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing lung surgery
Hyuckgoo Kim, Jisoo Han, Sung Mee Jung, Sang-Jin Park, Nyeong Keon Kwon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):54-62.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.54
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The type and regimen of anesthesia may affect perioperative hyperglycemia following major surgical stress. This study compared the effects of sevoflurane and propofol on the incidence of hyperglycemia and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing lung surgery.
Methods
This retrospective study included 176 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had undergone lung surgery. Blood glucose levels and clinical outcomes from the preoperative period to the first 2 postoperative days (PODs) were retrospectively examined in patients who received sevoflurane (group S, n= 87) and propofol (group P, n=89) for maintenance of general anesthesia. The primary endpoint was the incidence of persistent hyperglycemia (2 consecutive blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL [10.0 mmol/L]) during the perioperative period. The secondary composite endpoint was the incidence of major postoperative complications and 30-day mortality rate after surgery.
Results
Blood glucose levels similarly increased from the preoperative period to the second POD in both groups (p=0.857). Although blood glucose levels at 2 hours after surgery were significantly lower in group P than in group S (p=0.022; 95% confidence interval for mean difference, -27.154 to -2.090), there was no difference in the incidence of persistent hyperglycemia during the perioperative period (group S, 70%; group P, 69%; p=0.816). The composite of major postoperative complications and all-cause in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates were also comparable between the two groups.
Conclusion
Sevoflurane and propofol were associated with a comparable incidence of perioperative hyperglycemia and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing lung surgery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Strategies for intraoperative glucose management: a scoping review
    Nathaniel Morin, Sarah Taylor, Danae Krahn, Leyla Baghirzada, Michael Chong, Tyrone G. Harrison, Anne Cameron, Shannon M. Ruzycki
    Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie.2023; 70(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Impact of total intravenous anesthesia and total inhalation anesthesia as the anesthesia maintenance approaches on blood glucose level and postoperative complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial
    Xinghui Xiong, Yong He, Cheng Zhou, Qin Zheng, Chan Chen, Peng Liang
    BMC Anesthesiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current trends in management of hyperglycaemia in surgical patients with diabetes mellitus: a review
    Vladimir N. Kuklin, J. Matri, N. P. Barlow, S. H. Tveit, J. E. Kvernberg, E. -M. Ringvold, V. Dahl
    Annals of Critical Care.2022; (4): 33.     CrossRef
  • Effects of sevoflurane anesthesia and abdominal surgery on the systemic metabolome: a prospective observational study
    Yiyong Wei, Donghang Zhang, Jin Liu, Mengchan Ou, Peng Liang, Yunxia Zuo, Cheng Zhou
    BMC Anesthesiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Reports
Metformin induced acute pancreatitis and lactic acidosis in a patient on hemodialysis.
Yeon Kyung Lee, Kihyun Lim, Su Hyun Hwang, Young Hwan Ahn, Gyu Tae Shin, Heungsoo Kim, In Whee Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2016;33(1):33-36.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2016.33.1.33
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  • 14 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Metformin, commonly prescribed for type 2 diabetes, is considered safe with minimal side-effect. Acute pancreatitis is rare but potentially fatal adverse side-effect of metformin. We report a patient on hemodialysis with metformin-related acute pancreatitis and lactic acidosis. A 62-year-old woman with diabetic nephropathy and hypertension presented with nausea and vomiting for a few weeks, followed by epigastric pain. At home, the therapy of 500 mg/day metformin and 50 mg/day sitagliptin was continued, despite symptoms. Laboratory investigations showed metabolic acidosis with high levels of lactate, amylase at 520 U/L (range, 30-110 U/L), and lipase at 1,250 U/L (range, 23-300 U/L). Acute pancreatitis was confirmed by computed tomography. No recognized cause of acute pancreatitis was identified. Metformin was discontinued. Treatment with insulin and intravenous fluids resulted in normalized amylase, lipase, and lactate. When she was re-exposed to sitagliptin, no symptoms were reported.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sex-differences in [68Ga]Ga-DOTANOC biodistribution
    A. Leisser, K. Lukic, M. Nejabat, W. Wadsak, M. Mitterhauser, M. Mayerhöfer, G. Karnaikas, M. Raderer, M. Hacker, A.R. Haug
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A Case of Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Dong Hyun Kim, Jang Won Lee, Min Suk Jung, Seung Hyun Lee, Byung Cheol Min, Hyun Ju Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2013;30(2):136-140.   Published online December 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2013.30.2.136
  • 2,203 View
  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common complication and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in diabetic patients. The occurrence of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) in diabetic patients has been increasingly recognized in recent years. Generally, renal injuries in DN are deemed difficult to reverse, whereas some NDRDs are often treatable and even remittable. Thus, the diagnosis of NDRD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) via a kidney biopsy would be significant for its prognosis and therapeutic strategy. According to recent studies, the most common NDRD is IgA nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients, and some cases of minimal change disease and membranous glomerulonephritis have been reported in Korea. However, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) is an uncommon condition in diabetic patients. To our knowledge, there has been no case yet of MPGN, except in a child with type 1 DM. We present an unusual case of a 27-year-old woman who had type 2 DM with MPGN, as confirmed via a kidney biopsy.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science