Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

Indexed in: ESCI, Scopus, PubMed,
PubMed Central, CAS, DOAJ, KCI
FREE article processing charge
OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
19 "Diagnosis"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original articles
How much does clinical prediagnosis correlate with electrophysiological findings?: a retrospective study
Selda Çiftci İnceoğlu, Aylin Ayyıldız, Figen Yılmaz, Banu Kuran
Received April 24, 2024  Accepted June 5, 2024  Published online July 5, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2024.00381    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 97 View
  • 10 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Electrodiagnostic testing (EDX) is important in the diagnosis and follow-up of neuropathic and myopathic diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate the compatibility between clinical prediagnosis and electrophysiological findings.
Methods
EDX results from 2004 to 2020 at the physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) clinic were screened. Tests with missing data, reevaluation studies, and cases of peripheral facial paralysis were excluded. The clinical prediagnosis and EDX results were recorded, and their compatibility was evaluated.
Results
A total of 2,153 tests were included in this study. The mean age was 49.0±13.9 years and 1,533 of them (71.2%) were female. The most frequently referred clinic was the PM&R clinic (90.0%). Numbness (73.6%) was the most common complaint, followed by pain (15.3%) and weakness (13.9%). The most common prediagnosis was entrapment neuropathy (55.3%), radiculopathy (16.1%), and polyneuropathy (15.7%). Carpal tunnel syndrome was the most frequently identified type of entrapment neuropathy (78.3%). Six hundred and seventy EDX results (31.1%) were within normal limits. While the EDX results were consistent with the prediagnosis in 1,328 patients (61.7%), a pathology different from the prediagnosis was detected in 155 patients (7.2%). In the discrepancy group, the most common pathologies were entrapment neuropathy (51.7%), polyneuropathy (17.3%), and radiculopathy (15.1%). The most common neuropathy type was carpal tunnel syndrome (79.3%).
Conclusion
After adequate anamnesis and physical and neurological examinations, requesting further appropriate tests will increase the prediagnosis accuracy and prevent unnecessary expenditure of time and labor.
Performance of the BD MAX MDR-TB assay in a clinical setting and its impact on the clinical course of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a retrospective before-after study
Sung Jun Ko, Kui Hyun Yoon, Sang Hee Lee
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2024;41(2):113-119.   Published online April 5, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2024.00024
  • 1,016 View
  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Missing isoniazid (INH) resistance during tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis can worsen the outcomes of INH-resistant TB. The BD MAX MDR-TB assay (BD MAX) facilitates the rapid detection of TB and INH and rifampin (RIF) resistance; however, data related to its performance in clinical setting remain limited. Moreover, its effect on treatment outcomes has not yet been studied.
Methods
We compared the performance of BD MAX for the detection of INH/RIF resistances to that of the line probe assay (LPA) in patients with pulmonary TB (PTB), using the results of a phenotypic drug sensitivity test as a reference standard. The treatment outcomes of patients who used BD MAX were compared with those of patients who did not.
Results
Of the 83 patients included in the study, the BD MAX was used for an initial PTB diagnosis in 39 patients. The sensitivity of BD MAX for detecting PTB was 79.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of BD MAX for INH resistance were both 100%, whereas these were 50.0% and 95.8%, respectively, for RIF resistance. The sensitivity and specificity of BD MAX were comparable to those of LPA. The BD MAX group had a shorter time interval from specimen request to the initiation of anti-TB drugs (2.0 days vs. 5.5 days, p=0.001).
Conclusion
BD MAX showed comparable performance to conventional tests for detecting PTB and INH/RIF resistances. The implementation of BD MAX as a diagnostic tool for PTB resulted in a shorter turnaround time for the initiation of PTB treatment.
Focused Review article
State-of-the-art update for diagnosing diabetic foot osteomyelitis: a narrative review
Inha Woo, Seung Jae Cho, Chul Hyun Park
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):321-327.   Published online October 12, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00976
  • 1,546 View
  • 90 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Recently, the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot and the Infectious Diseases Society of America divided diabetic foot disease into diabetic foot infection (DFI) and diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO). DFI is usually diagnosed clinically, while numerous methods exist to diagnose DFO. In this narrative review, the authors aim to summarize the updated data on the diagnosis of DFO. An extensive literature search using “diabetic foot [MeSH]” and “osteomyelitis [MeSH]” or “diagnosis” was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar in July 2023. The possibility of DFO is based on inflammatory clinical signs, including the probe-to-bone (PTB) test. Elevated inflammatory biochemical markers, especially erythrocyte sedimentation rate, are beneficial. Distinguishing abnormal findings of plain radiographs is also a first-line approach. Moreover, sophisticated modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear medicine imaging, are helpful if doubt remains after a first-line diagnosis. Transcutaneous bone biopsy, which does not pass through the wound, is necessary to avoid contaminating the sample. This review focuses on the current diagnostic techniques for DFOs with an emphasis on the updates. To obtain the correct therapeutic results, selecting a proper option is necessary. Based on these numerous diagnosis modalities and indications, the proper choice of diagnostic tool can have favorable treatment outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Unveiling the challenges of diabetic foot infections: diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and rehabilitation
    Chul Hyun Park
    Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science.2023; 40(4): 319.     CrossRef
Original articles
Diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in discriminating between bacterial and nonbacterial colitis: a retrospective study
Jae Yong Lee, So Yeon Lee, Yoo Jin Lee, Jin Wook Lee, Jeong Seok Kim, Ju Yup Lee, Byoung Kuk Jang, Woo Jin Chung, Kwang Bum Cho, Jae Seok Hwang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):388-393.   Published online April 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00059
  • 1,561 View
  • 60 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Differentiating between bacterial and nonbacterial colitis remains a challenge. We aimed to evaluate the value of serum procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in differentiating between bacterial and nonbacterial colitis.
Methods
Adult patients with three or more episodes of watery diarrhea and colitis symptoms within 14 days of a hospital visit were eligible for this study. The patients’ stool pathogen polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing results, serum PCT levels, and serum CRP levels were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into bacterial and nonbacterial colitis groups according to their PCR. The laboratory data were compared between the two groups. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy.
Results
In total, 636 patients were included; 186 in the bacterial colitis group and 450 in the nonbacterial colitis group. In the bacterial colitis group, Clostridium perfringens was the commonest pathogen (n=70), followed by Clostridium difficile toxin B (n=60). The AUC for PCT and CRP was 0.557 and 0.567, respectively, indicating poor discrimination. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing bacterial colitis were 54.8% and 52.6% for PCT, and 52.2% and 54.2% for CRP, respectively. Combining PCT and CRP measurements did not increase the discrimination performance (AUC, 0.522; 95% confidence interval, 0.474–0.571).
Conclusion
Neither PCT nor CRP helped discriminate bacterial colitis from nonbacterial colitis.
Rates and subsequent clinical course of fetal congenital anomalies detected by prenatal targeted ultrasonography of 137 cases over 5 years in a single institute: a retrospective observational study
Haewon Choi, Hyo-Shin Kim, Joon Sakong
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(3):268-275.   Published online November 2, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00514
  • 1,680 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
With the establishment of international guidelines and changes in insurance policies in Korea, the role of targeted ultrasonography has increased. This study aimed to identify the rates and clinical course of anomalies detected using prenatal targeted ultrasonography.
Methods
This study was a retrospective analysis of all pregnancies with targeted ultrasonography performed in a single secondary medical center over 5 years.
Results
Fetal anomalies were detected by targeted ultrasonography in 137 of the 8,147 cases (1.7%). The rates of anomalies were significantly higher in female fetuses (2.0% vs. 1.3%). In cases of female fetuses, the rate of anomalies was significantly higher in the advanced maternal age group (2.4% vs. 1.2%). In cases of male fetuses, the rate of anomalies was significantly higher in nulliparous (2.4% vs. 1.5%) and twin (5.7% vs. 1.9%) pregnancies. Pulmonary anomalies were significantly more common in the multiparity group (17.6% vs. 5.8%). Among the 137 cases, 17.5% terminated the pregnancy, 16.8% were diagnosed as normal after birth, and 42.3% were diagnosed with anomalies after birth or required follow-up.
Conclusion
Through the first study on the rates and clinical course of anomalies detected by targeted ultrasonography at a single secondary center in Korea, we found that artificial abortions were performed at a high rate, even for relatively mild anomalies or anomalies with good prognosis. We suggest the necessity of a nationwide study to establish clinical guidelines based on actual incidences or prognoses.
Review article
Avulsion injuries: an update on radiologic findings
Changwon Choi, Sun Joo Lee, Hye Jung Choo, In Sook Lee, Sung Kwan Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(4):289-307.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01102
  • 9,970 View
  • 195 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Avulsion injuries result from the application of a tensile force to a musculoskeletal unit or ligament. Although injuries tend to occur more commonly in skeletally immature populations due to the weakness of their apophysis, adults may also be subject to avulsion fractures, particularly those with osteoporotic bones. The most common sites of avulsion injuries in adolescents and children are apophyses of the pelvis and knee. In adults, avulsion injuries commonly occur within the tendon due to underlying degeneration or tendinosis. However, any location can be involved in avulsion injuries. Radiography is the first imaging modality to diagnose avulsion injury, although advanced imaging modalities are occasionally required to identify subtle lesions or to fully delineate the extent of the injury. Ultrasonography has a high spatial resolution with a dynamic assessment potential and allows the comparison of a bone avulsion with the opposite side. Computed tomography is more sensitive for depicting a tiny osseous fragment located adjacent to the expected attachment site of a ligament, tendon, or capsule. Moreover, magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of soft tissue abnormalities, especially the affected muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Acute avulsion injuries usually manifest as avulsed bone fragments. In contrast, chronic injuries can easily mimic other disease processes, such as infections or neoplasms. Therefore, recognizing the vulnerable sites and characteristic imaging features of avulsion fractures would be helpful in ensuring accurate diagnosis and appropriate patient management. To this end, familiarity with musculoskeletal anatomy and mechanism of injury is necessary.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Surgical management of posterior ligament complex stripping in an adolescent spinal flexion distraction injury: A case report and literature review
    Dong-Ju Lim
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2024; 114: 109195.     CrossRef
  • Ischial Tuberosity Avulsion Fracture Mimicking Calcified Mass on Plain Films: A Case Report
    Mason A Williams, Lena Naffaa
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • ESR essentials: MRI of the knee—practice recommendations by ESSR
    Anagha P. Parkar, Miraude E. A. P. M. Adriaensen
    European Radiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Isolated fracture of the lesser tuberosity of the humerus – a rare injury that requires surgical treatment
    Miodrag Glisic, Vladan Stevanovic, Aleksandar Jevtic, Uros Jovicevic, Ivan Jankovic
    Vojnosanitetski pregled.2023; 80(3): 279.     CrossRef
Original article
Clinical investigation on acute pyelonephritis without pyuria: a retrospective observational study
Hyung Keun Song, Dong Hyuk Shin, Ji Ung Na, Sang Kuk Han, Pil Cho Choi, Jang Hee Lee
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(1):39-45.   Published online August 11, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01207
  • 6,682 View
  • 203 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The current guidelines for the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) recommend that APN be diagnosed based on the clinical features and the presence of pyuria. However, we observed that some of the patients who are diagnosed with APN do not have characteristic clinical features or pyuria at the initial examination. We performed this study to investigate the characteristics of APN without pyuria.
Methods
A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on 391 patients diagnosed with APN based on clinical and radiologic findings, between 2015 and 2019. The clinical features, laboratory results, and computed tomography (CT) findings were compared between patients with normal white blood cell (WBC) counts and those with abnormal WBC counts (WBC of 0–5/high power field [HPF] vs. >5/HPF) in urine.
Results
More than 50% of patients with APN had no typical urinary tract symptoms and one-third of them had no costovertebral angle (CVA) tenderness. Eighty-eight patients (22.5%) had normal WBC counts (0–5/HPF) on urine microscopy. There was a negative correlation between pyuria (WBC of >5/HPF) and previous antibiotic use (odds ratio, 0.249; 95% confidence interval, 0.140–0.441; p<0.001), and the probability of pyuria was reduced by 75.1% in patients who took antibiotics before visiting the emergency room.
Conclusion
The diagnosis of APN should not be overlooked even if there are no typical clinical features, or urine microscopic examination is normal. If a patient has already taken antibiotics at the time of diagnosis, imaging studies such as CT should be performed more actively, regardless of the urinalysis results.
Review article
Current diagnosis and treatment of vestibular neuritis: a narrative review
Chang Hoon Bae, Hyung Gyun Na, Yoon Seok Choi
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(2):81-88.   Published online August 9, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01228
  • 65,535 View
  • 500 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Vertigo is the sensation of self-motion of the head or body when no self-motion is occurring or the sensation of distorted self-motion during an otherwise normal head movement. Representative peripheral vertigo disorders include benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière disease, and vestibular neuritis. Vestibular neuritis, also known as vestibular neuronitis, is the third most common peripheral vestibular disorder after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and Ménière disease. The cause of vestibular neuritis remains unclear. However, a viral infection of the vestibular nerve or ischemia of the anterior vestibular artery is known to cause vestibular neuritis. In addition, recent studies on immune-mediated mechanisms as the cause of vestibular neuritis have been reported. The characteristic clinical features of vestibular neuritis are abrupt true-whirling vertigo lasting for more than 24 hours, and no presence of cochlear symptoms and other neurological symptoms and signs. To accurately diagnose vestibular neuritis, various diagnostic tests such as the head impulse test, bithermal caloric test, and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test are conducted. Various treatments for vestibular neuritis have been reported, which are largely divided into symptomatic therapy, specific drug therapy, and vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Symptomatic therapies include generalized supportive care and administration of vestibular suppressants and antiemetics. Specific drug therapies include steroid therapy, antiviral therapy, and vasodilator therapy. Vestibular rehabilitation therapies include generalized vestibular and customized vestibular exercises.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Vestibular function is associated with immune inflammatory response
    Zhaohui Song, Yuchuan Ding, Nathan Sim, Ho Jun Yun, Jing Feng, Pan Gu, Xiaokun Geng
    Reviews in the Neurosciences.2024; 35(3): 293.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Scarpa’s ganglion enhancement on high-resolution MRI imaging
    Clayton Siminski, John C Benson, Matthew L Carlson, John I Lane
    The Neuroradiology Journal.2024; 37(3): 332.     CrossRef
  • Vestibular rehabilitation for peripheral vestibular hypofunction: an interdisciplinary consensus
    N.L. Kunelskay, G.E. Ivanova, E.V. Baybakova, A.L. Guseva, V.A. Parfenov, M.V. Zamergrad, O.V. Zaitseva, O.A. Melnikov, A.A. Shmonin, M.N. Maltseva
    Vestnik otorinolaringologii.2024; 89(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • A Review of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide and Its Implications for Vestibular Disorders
    Richard Baron, Kristen K. Steenerson
    Current Treatment Options in Neurology.2024; 26(6): 203.     CrossRef
  • Evolution of Hyperventilation-Induced Nystagmus in Acute Unilateral Vestibulopathy—Interpretative Model and Etiopathogenetic Hypotheses
    Francesco Frati, Alessandra D’Orazio, Valeria Gambacorta, Giacomo Ciacca, Giampietro Ricci, Mario Faralli
    Audiology Research.2024; 14(3): 442.     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the impact of COVID-19 on vertigo and hearing impairment: A post-recovery analysis
    Sarah Alshehri, Khalid A. Alahmari
    Medicine.2024; 103(27): e38819.     CrossRef
  • Vertigo in the Setting of COVID-19 Infection: A Case Report
    Sanjana Devaragudi, Mohit Gupta
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hospital Admission Profile Related to Inner Ear Diseases in England and Wales
    Esra’ O. Taybeh, Abdallah Y. Naser
    Healthcare.2023; 11(10): 1457.     CrossRef
  • Symptom of vertigo and dizziness in patients with COVID-19
    E. V. Isakova
    Russian neurological journal.2023; 28(4): 5.     CrossRef
  • VESTIBULAR NEURONITIS: A CLINICAL EXAMPLE OF THE COURSE OF THE DISEASE USING BIOFEEDBACK (BOS)
    Geraskina M.M., Razzhivina K.S., Ustinov S.A.
    "Medical & pharmaceutical journal "Pulse".2023; : 30.     CrossRef
  • Acute vestibular neuritis: A rare complication after the adenoviral vector-based COVID-19 vaccine
    Hamze Shahali, Ramin Hamidi Farahani, Parham Hazrati, Ebrahim Hazrati
    Journal of NeuroVirology.2022; 28(4-6): 609.     CrossRef
  • A Holistic Approach to a Dizzy Patient: A Practical Update
    Ioannis Koukoulithras, Gianna Drousia, Spyridon Kolokotsios, Minas Plexousakis, Alexandra Stamouli, Charis Roussos, Eleana Xanthi
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identification of hub genes and pathophysiological mechanism related to acute unilateral vestibulopathy by integrated bioinformatics analysis
    Yajing Cheng, Jianrong Zheng, Ying Zhan, Cong Liu, Bihua Lu, Jun Hu
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case report
The diagnosis of an imperforate anus in female fetuses
Hyun Mi Kim, Hyun-Hwa Cha, Jong In Kim, Won Joon Seong, Sook-Hyun Park, Mi Ju Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(3):240-244.   Published online October 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00507
  • 9,261 View
  • 196 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Imperforate anus is an anomaly caused by a defect in the development of the hindgut during early pregnancy. It is a relatively common congenital malformation and is more common in males. Although there are cases of a solitary imperforate anus, the condition is more commonly found as a part of a wider spectrum of other congenital anomalies. Although urgent reconstructive anorectal surgery is not necessary, immediate evaluation is important and urgent decompressive surgery may be required. Moreover, as there are often other anomalies that can affect management, prenatal diagnosis can help in optimizing perinatal care and prepare parents through prenatal counseling. In the past, imperforate anus was diagnosed by prenatal ultrasonography based on indirect signs such as bowel dilatation or intraluminal calcified meconium. Currently, it is diagnosed by directly checking the perineum with prenatal ultrasonography. Despite advances in ultrasound technology, accurate prenatal diagnosis is impossible in most cases and imperforate anus is detected after birth. Here, we present two cases of imperforate anus in female fetuses that were not diagnosed prenatally.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ultrasonography guided puncture and dilatation in membranous rectal atresia
    Cunera M.C. de Beaufort, Joep P.M. Derikx, Simon G.F. Robben, Rick R. van Rijn, Ramon R. Gorter, L.W. Ernest van Heurn
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports.2023; 89: 102564.     CrossRef
  • Radiology findings of Down syndrome: a literature review
    Jacobus Jeno Wibisono, Carissa Faustina, Maria Georgina Wibisono, Jeanne Leman, Ratna Sutanto
    Chinese Journal of Academic Radiology.2023; 6(4): 133.     CrossRef
  • Аноректальні аномалії розвитку
    Ольга Антонюк, Василь Пикалюк, Олександр Слободян, Альона Романюк, Людмила Шварц
    Notes in Current Biology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anorectoplasty and external sphincteroplasty via inverted V-shaped incision on the perineum for the treatment of imperforate anus with rectal fistula to navicular fossa: Report of 26 cases
    Da Ma, Yi Wang, Ying-Song Liu
    Asian Journal of Surgery.2022; 45(6): 1313.     CrossRef
  • Challenges in prenatal diagnosis of foetal anorectal malformation and hydrocolpos – Case report
    Muhammad Alamsyah Aziz, Fatima Zahra, Cut ZB Razianti, Nuniek Kharismawati, Tjut Sutjighassani, Nadia Larastri Almira, Kevin Dominique Tjandraprawira
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Focused Review article
Diagnosis and treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis
Jong Geol Jang, Jin Hong Chung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):277-285.   Published online September 4, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00626
  • 17,084 View
  • 555 Download
  • 53 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major health problem worldwide. Especially, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), which is defined as TB that shows resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin, is a barrier in the treatment of TB. Globally, approximately 3.4% of new TB patients and 20% of the patients with a history of previous treatment for TB were diagnosed with MDR-TB. The treatment of MDR-TB requires medications for a long duration (up to 20–24 months) with less effective and toxic second-line drugs and has unfavorable outcomes. However, treatment outcomes are expected to improve due to the introduction of a new agent (bedaquiline), repurposed drugs (linezolid, clofazimine, and cycloserine), and technological advancement in rapid drug sensitivity testing. The World Health Organization (WHO) released a rapid communication in 2018, followed by consolidated guidelines for the treatment of MDR-TB in 2019 based on clinical trials and an individual patient data meta-analysis. In these guidelines, the WHO suggested reclassification of second-line anti-TB drugs and recommended oral treatment regimens that included the new and repurposed agents. The aims of this article are to review the treatment strategies of MDR-TB based on the 2019 WHO guidelines regarding the management of MDR-TB and the diagnostic techniques for detecting resistance, including phenotypic and molecular drug sensitivity tests.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Computational insights into potential marine natural products as selective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA: A structure-based virtual screening study
    Manikandan Jayaraman, Vijayakumar Gosu, Rajalakshmi Kumar, Jeyakanthan Jeyaraman
    Computational Biology and Chemistry.2024; 108: 107991.     CrossRef
  • Targeting of essential mycobacterial replication enzyme DnaG primase revealed Mitoxantrone and Vapreotide as novel mycobacterial growth inhibitors**
    Waseem Ali, Salma Jamal, Rishabh Gangwar, Faraz Ahmed, Rahul Sharma, Meetu Agarwal, Javaid Ahmad Sheikh, Abhinav Grover, Sonam Grover
    Molecular Informatics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Comprehensive Review on Long vs. Short Regimens in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Under Programmatic Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT)
    Ashwin Karnan, Ulhas Jadhav, Babaji Ghewade, Anjana Ledwani, Poorna Shivashankar
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrido-[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-2-amine analogues as antimycobacterial agents
    Boddupalli Venkata Siva Kumar, Yogesh Mahadu Khetmalis, Kosana Sai Chaitanya, Ala Chandu, Gauri Shetye, Rui Ma, Sankaranarayanan Murugesan, Scott G. Franzblau, Kondapalli Venkata Gowri Chandra Sekhar
    Journal of Molecular Structure.2024; 1303: 137600.     CrossRef
  • Direct TAMRA-dUTP labeling of M. tuberculosis genes using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)
    Basma Altattan, Jasmin Ullrich, Emily Mattig, Aline Poppe, Renata Martins, Frank F. Bier
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial peptides as new-generation antibiotics against Mycobacterium
    Parisa Eslami, Adnan Khosravi
    Journal of Preventive, Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies in Medicine.2024; 3(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in an Active Duty Military Health Care Worker
    Amanda E Saunders, Kevin M Shanahan, John W Downs
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Non-Adherence to Treatment Among Migrants with MDR-TB in Wuhan, China: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Kunhe Lin, Li Xiang
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2024; Volume 17: 727.     CrossRef
  • Development of a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system to deliver delamanid via a pressurized metered dose inhaler for treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis
    Himanshu Paliwal, Titpawan Nakpheng, Pijush Kumar Paul, K. Prem Ananth, Teerapol Srichana
    International Journal of Pharmaceutics.2024; 655: 124031.     CrossRef
  • Drug Targets, Current and Future Therapeutics for the Treatment of Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis with their Clinical Applications: A Critical Review
    Deepshikha Singh, Vikram Singh, Subhankar P. Mandal, Karen Dsouza, B.R. Prashantha Kumar, Sheshagiri R. Dixit
    Current Drug Therapy.2024; 19(3): 317.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology and Management of Infections in Liver Transplant Recipients
    Waseem Amjad, Syed Hamaad Rahman, Thomas D. Schiano, Syed-Mohammed Jafri
    Surgical Infections.2024; 25(4): 272.     CrossRef
  • Survival Probability in Multidrug Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in a South Indian Region
    Thungathurthi Smitha, Pantham Sunitha, Orsu Prabhakar, Sindgi Vasudeva Murthy
    Hospital Pharmacy.2024; 59(4): 427.     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis: Implications for Dentistry
    Xue-Mei Chong, Lucy McClean, Paddy McMaster
    Dental Update.2024; 51(4): 258.     CrossRef
  • The mechanisms and clinical potential of collateral sensitivity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A literature review
    Muhammad Zain Raza, Hafiz Muhammad Ehsan Arshad, Musab Maqsood, Muhammad Hashim Faisal
    The Microbe.2024; 3: 100086.     CrossRef
  • Confronting Tuberculosis: A Synthetic Quinoline-Isonicotinic Acid Hydrazide Hybrid Compound as a Potent Lead Molecule Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Govinda Raju Vadankula, Vipul V. Nilkanth, Arshad Rizvi, Sriram Yandrapally, Anushka Agarwal, Hepshibha Chirra, Rashmita Biswas, Mohammed Arifuddin, Vijay Nema, Alvala Mallika, Shekhar C. Mande, Sharmistha Banerjee
    ACS Infectious Diseases.2024; 10(6): 2288.     CrossRef
  • Advancements in Artificial Intelligence for the Diagnosis of Multidrug Resistance and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: A Comprehensive Review
    Shanmuga Priya K, Anbumaran Parivakkam mani, Geethalakshmi S, Sankalp Yadav
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Opinion review of drug resistant tuberculosis in West Africa: tackling the challenges for effective control
    Isaac Darko Otchere, Adwoa Asante-Poku, Kodjo Francis Akpadja, Awa Ba Diallo, Adama Sanou, Prince Asare, Stephen Osei-Wusu, Nneka Onyejepu, Bassirou Diarra, Yaotsè Anoumou Dagnra, Aderemi Kehinde, Martin Antonio, Dorothy Yeboah-Manu
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advanced integrative molecular platform for high-throughput screening of drug-resistant tuberculosis
    Minal Dakhave, Trupti Rale, Harshada Suryawanshi, Nikita Patil, Abhijeet Suryawanshi, Raju Kumar, Shruti Gadekar, Payal Bhatnagar, Amrita Khaire, Gautam Wankhede
    Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease.2024; 109(4): 116373.     CrossRef
  • The use of additive technologies to increase adherence to treatment, increase the efficiency of chemotherapy and correction of indicators of anxiety and depression among patients with destructive pulmonary tuberculosis
    Alexey G. Naumov, Alexander S. Shprykov, Marina A. Dolgova, Natalia V. Fomina
    Consilium Medicum.2024; 26(03): 199.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Patterns of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Newly Diagnosed Patients in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Cong Jin, Yuting Wu, Jiangpo Chen, Jing Liu, Hongwei Zhang, Qingzeng Qian, Tieliang Pang
    Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship of 2,6-Disubstituted Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives of Pyridine as Potential Antituberculosis Agents
    Dagmara Ziembicka, Katarzyna Gobis, Małgorzata Szczesio, Andrzej Olczak, Ewa Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Agnieszka Głogowska, Izabela Korona-Głowniak, Krzysztof Bojanowski
    Materials.2023; 16(1): 448.     CrossRef
  • Multidrug-Resistant TB (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug-Resistant TB (XDR-TB) Among Children: Where We Stand Now
    Kona Chowdhury, Rahnuma Ahmad, Susmita Sinha, Siddhartha Dutta, Mainul Haque
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anxiety and depression level of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two hospitals in Banten province, Indonesia
    Tirta Darmawan Susanto, Allen Widysanto, Darien Alfa Cipta, Arron Tanara, Ghivarell Rizkie Wirawan, Adeline Bercadina Kosim, Christabella Maria Djoni, Ervinna Tantri, Chandni Kumar, Chelsie Angelius
    Dialogues in Health.2023; 2: 100115.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Previous Tuberculosis Treatment History in Patients with Treatment Failure and the Impact on Acquired Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis
    Soedarsono Soedarsono, Ni Made Mertaniasih, Tutik Kusmiati, Ariani Permatasari, Wiwik Kurnia Ilahi, Amelia Tantri Anggraeni
    Antibiotics.2023; 12(3): 598.     CrossRef
  • Evolution of tuberculosis diagnostics: From molecular strategies to nanodiagnostics
    Srestha Mukherjee, Summaya Perveen, Anjali Negi, Rashmi Sharma
    Tuberculosis.2023; 140: 102340.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of the Diagnostic Utility of GeneXpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis/Rifampicin (MTB/RIF) Assay in the Suspected Cases of Tuberculous Meningitis
    Sakshi Patel, Malti Dadheech, Anand K Maurya, Jitendra Singh, Shashank Purwar, Nirendra Rai, Radha Sarawagi, Ankur Joshi, Sagar Khadanga
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tandem LC-MS Identification of Antitubercular Compounds in Zones of Growth Inhibition Produced by South African Filamentous Actinobacteria
    Daniel J. Watson, Lubbe Wiesner, Tlhalefo Matimela, Denzil Beukes, Paul R. Meyers
    Molecules.2023; 28(11): 4276.     CrossRef
  • Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Stigma Among HealthCare Workers Toward the Development of a Stigma-Reduction Strategy: A Scoping Review
    Lolita Liboon Aranas, Khorshed Alam, Prajwal Gyawali, Rashidul Mahumud Alam
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quality Mindset: The Missing Ingredient in Tuberculosis Care and Control in Togo
    Kossivi Agbélénko Afanvi, Mohammed Fall Dogo, Koffi Atsu Aziagbé, Komi Séraphin Adjoh, Koumavi Kristoli Didier Ekouévi
    European Journal of Theoretical and Applied Sciences.2023; 1(4): 36.     CrossRef
  • Machine Learning of the Whole Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Scoping PRISMA-Based Review
    Ricardo Perea-Jacobo, Guillermo René Paredes-Gutiérrez, Miguel Ángel Guerrero-Chevannier, Dora-Luz Flores, Raquel Muñiz-Salazar
    Microorganisms.2023; 11(8): 1872.     CrossRef
  • Cotreatment With Clofazimine and Rapamycin Eliminates Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis by Inducing Polyfunctional Central Memory T-Cell Responses
    Dhiraj Kumar Singh, Ashima Bhaskar, Isha Pahuja, Aishwarya Shaji, Barnani Moitra, Yufang Shi, Ved Prakash Dwivedi, Gobardhan Das
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2023; 228(9): 1166.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis in children and young adolescents in Brazil
    Fernanda Bruzadelli Paulino da Costa, Thaís Zamboni Berra, Jaqueline Garcia de Almeida Ballestero, Patricia Bartholomay Oliveira, Daniele Maria Pelissari, Yan Mathias Alves, Antônio Carlos Vieira Ramos, Juliana Queiroz Rocha de Paiva, Titilade Kehinde Aya
    Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases.2023; 33: 100388.     CrossRef
  • Tackling Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: New Challenges from the Old Pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Giuseppe Mancuso, Angelina Midiri, Silvia De Gaetano, Elena Ponzo, Carmelo Biondo
    Microorganisms.2023; 11(9): 2277.     CrossRef
  • Drug-resistant Monoarticular Wrist Joint Tuberculosis in Renal Transplant Recipient with Literature Review
    Jasmine Sethi, Vignesh Subramani, Rajender Kumar, Shivakumar Patil, Ashish Sharma
    Indian Journal of Transplantation.2023; 17(3): 371.     CrossRef
  • Predictive capabilities of baseline radiological findings for early and late disease outcomes within sensitive and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis cases
    Gabriel Rosenfeld, Andrei Gabrielian, Darrell Hurt, Alex Rosenthal
    European Journal of Radiology Open.2023; 11: 100518.     CrossRef
  • Nanocarriers in Tuberculosis Treatment: Challenges and Delivery Strategies
    Mahesh Kumar, Tarun Virmani, Girish Kumar, Rohitas Deshmukh, Ashwani Sharma, Sofia Duarte, Pedro Brandão, Pedro Fonte
    Pharmaceuticals.2023; 16(10): 1360.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis on the correlation between HIV infection and multidrug-resistance tuberculosis
    Yulong Song, Qian Jin, Jihai Qiu, Dan Ye
    Heliyon.2023; 9(11): e21956.     CrossRef
  • Current Insights into Diagnosing and Treating Neurotuberculosis in Adults
    Sofiati Dian, Ahmad Rizal Ganiem, Lindsey HM te Brake, Arjan van Laarhoven
    CNS Drugs.2023; 37(11): 957.     CrossRef
  • Economic burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis on patients and households: a global systematic review and meta-analysis
    Temesgen Yihunie Akalu, Archie C. A. Clements, Haileab Fekadu Wolde, Kefyalew Addis Alene
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nano vs Resistant Tuberculosis: Taking the Lung Route
    Deepika Sharma, Pooja, Sunita Nirban, Smriti Ojha, Tarun Kumar, Neha Jain, Najwa Mohamad, Pradeep Kumar, Manisha Pandey
    AAPS PharmSciTech.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multi-Drug Resistance Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Challenges in India: A Review
    Deepak Vishwakarma, Abhay Gaidhane, Sweta Sahu, Ashwini S Rathod
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis and its Implication with COVID-19
    Jasmine Arya, Sweety Dahiya, Anil Kumar Chhillar
    Coronaviruses.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis drug discovery: Progression and future interventions in the wake of emerging resistance
    Summaya Perveen, Diksha Kumari, Kuljit Singh, Rashmi Sharma
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.2022; 229: 114066.     CrossRef
  • Abdominal Tuberculosis Mimicking Ovarian Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
    Ikhwan Rinaldi, Abdul Muthalib, Djaja Gosal, Teguh Wijayadi, Barlian Sutedja, Tjondro Setiawan, Andika Gunawan, Nelly Susanto, Lingga Magdalena, Diah Rini Handjari, Fetisari Kurniawan, Aisyah Rifani, Kevin Winston
    International Medical Case Reports Journal.2022; Volume 15: 169.     CrossRef
  • Pediatric Tuberculosis Management: A Global Challenge or Breakthrough?
    Lehlogonolo N. F. Maphalle, Bozena B. Michniak-Kohn, Modupe O. Ogunrombi, Oluwatoyin A. Adeleke
    Children.2022; 9(8): 1120.     CrossRef
  • Various approaches to improving adherence of patients with tuberculosis. Prospects for the use of additive technologies in TB practice
    A. G. Naumov, A. S. Shprykov
    PULMONOLOGIYA.2022; 34(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anti-Tubercular Leads: A Concise Review
    Gabriel S. Oliveira, Raquel P. Costa, Paula Gomes, Maria Salomé Gomes, Tânia Silva, Cátia Teixeira
    Pharmaceuticals.2021; 14(4): 323.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of Human Babesiosis: Then and Now
    Isaline Renard, Choukri Ben Mamoun
    Pathogens.2021; 10(9): 1120.     CrossRef
  • Novel mutations detected from drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from North East of Thailand
    Ei Phoo Thwe, Wises Namwat, Porntip Pinlaor, Kulrattana Rueangsak, Arunnee Sangka
    World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • On the Mechanism of Development of Autoimmune Diseases Following Exposure to Inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    SV Skupnevskiy, GM Trukhina, EG Pukhaeva, AK Badtiev, FK Rurua, FE Batagova, ZhG Farnieva
    ЗДОРОВЬЕ НАСЕЛЕНИЯ И СРЕДА ОБИТАНИЯ - ЗНиСО / PUBLIC HEALTH AND LIFE ENVIRONMENT.2021; : 76.     CrossRef
  • Oral regimen for multi-drug-resistant TB can promote patient-centred and community-based treatment
    Suman Saurabh, Pankaj Bhardwaj
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2021; 10(12): 4607.     CrossRef
  • Adverse effects induced by second-line antituberculosis drugs: an update based on last WHO treatment recommendations for drug-resistant tuberculosis
    Ionela-Alina Grosu-Creangă, Antigona Carmen Trofor, Radu Adrian Crișan-Dabija, Daniela Robu-Popa, Cristina Mihaela Ghiciuc, Elena Cătălina Lupușoru
    Pneumologia.2021; 70(3): 117.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
Review article
Drug-induced liver injury
Jeong Ill Suh
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(1):2-12.   Published online August 27, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00297
  • 14,941 View
  • 366 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Drug-induced liver injury (DILI), including herbal and dietary supplement hepatotoxicity, is often passed lightly; however, it can lead to the requirement of a liver transplant or may even cause death because of liver failure. Recently, the American College of Gastroenterology, Chinese Society of Hepatology and European Association for the Study of the Liver guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of DILI have been established, and they will be helpful for guiding clinical treatment decisions. Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scoring is the most commonly used method to diagnose DILI; however, it has some limitations, such as poor validity and reproducibility. Recently, studies on new biomarkers have been actively carried out, which will help diagnose DILI and predict the prognosis of DILI. It is expected that the development of new therapies such as autophagy inducers and various other technologies of the fourth industrial revolution will be applicable to DILI research.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Drug-Induced Liver Injury Due to Doxycycline: A Case Report and Review of Literature
    Nikola Nikolajevic, Milan Nikolajevic, Ivana Pantic, Bojan Korica, Magdalena Kotseva, Tamara Alempijevic, Dorde Jevtic, Cristian I Madrid, Igor Dumic
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Drug-resistant epilepsy and its selected complications in children
    Magdalena Knopek, Joanna Iwanicka, Grzegorz Boryczka
    Annales Academiae Medicae Silesiensis.2024; 78: 127.     CrossRef
  • Liver Injury in Favipiravir-Treated COVID-19 Patients: Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study
    Amal Oweid Almutairi, Mahmoud Zaki El-Readi, Mohammad Althubiti, Yosra Zakariyya Alhindi, Nahla Ayoub, Abdullah R. Alzahrani, Saeed S. Al-Ghamdi, Safaa Yehia Eid
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2023; 8(2): 129.     CrossRef
  • Hepatotoxic Components Effect of Chebulae Fructus and Associated Molecular Mechanism by Integrated Transcriptome and Molecular Docking
    Liwen Ai, Fan Yang, Wanjun Hu, Liyang Guo, Weixue Liu, Xuexue Xue, Lulu Li, Zunlai Sheng
    Molecules.2023; 28(8): 3427.     CrossRef
  • Systematic Review of Safety of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators in Healthy Adults: Implications for Recreational Users
    Jonathan D. Vignali, Kevin C. Pak, Holly R. Beverley, Jesse P. DeLuca, John W. Downs, Adrian T. Kress, Brett W. Sadowski, Daniel J. Selig
    Journal of Xenobiotics.2023; 13(2): 218.     CrossRef
  • Antitubercular drugs induced liver injury: an updated insight into molecular mechanisms
    Devaraj Ezhilarasan
    Drug Metabolism Reviews.2023; 55(3): 239.     CrossRef
  • Advances in Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury Issues: New Clinical and Mechanistic Analysis Due to Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method Use
    Rolf Teschke, Gaby Danan
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(13): 10855.     CrossRef
  • Application of artificial intelligence and machine learning in early detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-induced toxicity
    Siyun Yang, Supratik Kar
    Artificial Intelligence Chemistry.2023; 1(2): 100011.     CrossRef
  • Rifampicin-induced ER stress and excessive cytoplasmic vacuolization instigate hepatotoxicity via alternate programmed cell death paraptosis in vitro and in vivo
    KM Kainat, Mohammad Imran Ansari, Nuzhat Bano, Pankaj Ramji Jagdale, Anjaneya Ayanur, Mahadeo Kumar, Pradeep Kumar Sharma
    Life Sciences.2023; 333: 122164.     CrossRef
  • Establishment of a Stable Acute Drug-Induced Liver Injury Mouse Model by Sodium Cyclamate
    Quan Zhou, Zhongtian Peng, Xialing Huang
    Journal of Inflammation Research.2022; Volume 15: 1599.     CrossRef
  • Mitochondrial toxicants in Xian-Ling-Gu-Bao induce liver injury by regulating the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway: an in vitro study
    Shujuan Piao, Hongwei Lin, Xia Tao, Wansheng Chen
    BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Kratom-Induced Liver Injury: A Case Series and Clinical Implications
    Mahesh Botejue, Gurjot Walia, Omar Shahin, Jyotsna Sharma, Rasiq Zackria
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Colestasis inducida por anabólicos: reporte de caso y revisión de la literatura
    Diana Lizeth Cabrera-Rojas, Juliana Soto-Cardona, Jorge Luis Toro-Molina, Juan Camilo Pérez-Cadavid, Juan Ignacio Marín-Zuluaga
    Hepatología.2021; : 273.     CrossRef
  • Hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in Wilson’s disease patients with liver failure
    Sylwia Szeląg-Pieniek, Stefan Oswald, Mariola Post, Joanna Łapczuk-Romańska, Marek Droździk, Mateusz Kurzawski
    Pharmacological Reports.2021; 73(5): 1427.     CrossRef
  • Prediction of Drug-Induced Liver Toxicity Using SVM and Optimal Descriptor Sets
    Keerthana Jaganathan, Hilal Tayara, Kil To Chong
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(15): 8073.     CrossRef
  • Five Constituents Contributed to the Psoraleae Fructus-Induced Hepatotoxicity via Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Apoptosis
    Zhaojuan Guo, Pin Li, Chunguo Wang, Qianjun Kang, Can Tu, Bingqian Jiang, Jingxuan Zhang, Weiling Wang, Ting Wang
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in Liver Function Test Results after Korean Medicine Treatment in Patients of a Korean Medicine Hospital: A Retrospective Chart Review
    Min Young Yim, Han Byeol Park, Jae Soo Kim, Hyun Jong Lee, Sung Chul Lim, Yun Kyu Lee
    Korean Journal of Acupuncture.2021; 38(4): 275.     CrossRef
  • Herb-induced Liver Injury in Asia and Current Role of RUCAM for Causality Assessment in 11,160 Published Cases
    Rolf Teschke, Yun Zhu, Jing Jing
    Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology.2020; 8(2): 200.     CrossRef
  • Embarazo y lesión hepática inducida por medicamentos. Reporte de un caso y revisión de la literatura
    Christian Labrador-López, Martín Garzón-Olarte, Rodrigo Daza-Fernández, Julián Martínez-Marín, Jorge Lizarazo-Rodríguez, Juan Carlos Molano-Villa, Juan Carlos Marulanda-Gómez, Mario Rey-Tovar
    Hepatología.2020; : 157.     CrossRef
Original article
Assessment of solid components of borderline ovarian tumor and stage I carcinoma: added value of combined diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging
See Hyung Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2019;36(3):231-240.   Published online June 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00234
Correction in: J Yeungnam Med Sci 2020;37(2):147
  • 8,488 View
  • 83 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
We sought to determine the value of combining diffusion-weighted (DW) and perfusion-weighted (PW) sequences with a conventional magnetic resonance (MR) sequence to assess solid components of borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) and stage I carcinomas.
Methods
Conventional, DW, and PW sequences in the tumor imaging studies of 70 patients (BOTs, n=38; stage I carcinomas, n=32) who underwent surgery with pathologic correlation were assessed. Two independent radiologists calculated the parameters apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), Ktrans (vessel permeability), and Ve (cell density) for the solid components. The distribution on conventional MR sequence and mean, standard deviation, and 95% confidence interval of each DW and PW parameter were calculated. The inter-observer agreement among the two radiologists was assessed. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and multivariate logistic regression were performed to compare the effectiveness of DW and PW sequences for average values and to characterize the diagnostic performance of combined DW and PW sequences.
Results
There were excellent agreements for DW and PW parameters between radiologists. The distributions of ADC, Ktrans and Ve values were significantly different between BOTs and stage I carcinomas, yielding AUCs of 0.58 and 0.68, 0.78 and 0.82, and 0.70 and 0.72, respectively, with ADC yielding the lowest diagnostic performance. The AUCs of the DW, PW, and combined PW and DW sequences were 0.71±0.05, 0.80±0.05, and 0.85±0.05, respectively.
Conclusion
Combining PW and DW sequences to a conventional sequence potentially improves the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of BOTs and stage I carcinomas.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of conventional diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and intravoxel incoherent motion in characterization of sonographically indeterminate adnexal masses
    Gurkawal Kaur, Smita Manchanda, Raju Sharma, Surabhi Vyas, Devasenathipathy Kandasamy, Smriti Hari, Neerja Bhatla, Sandeep R. Mathur
    Abdominal Radiology.2024; 49(5): 1512.     CrossRef
  • Advances in fertility preserving surgery for borderline ovarian tumors
    Mingdan Wang, Kuiran Liu
    European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.2022; 270: 206.     CrossRef
  • Recurrence characteristics and clinicopathological results of borderline ovarian tumors
    Lina Niu, Huihui Tian, Yongjun Xu, Jieqiong Cao, Xu Zhang, Junli Zhang, Jiajia Hou, Weiqin Lv, Junxia Wang, Li Xin, XuFeng Dong, Tao Xu, Yuan Nan, Hua Wei, Xinting Chai, Na Li, Yan Ni, Yun Shang, Lizhen Zhang, Ye Zhao
    BMC Women's Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Erratum to “Assessment of solid components of borderline ovarian tumor and stage I carcinoma: added value of combined diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging”
    See Hyung Kim
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(2): 147.     CrossRef
  • Minimal apparent diffusion coefficient value of the solid component to differentiate borderline and malignant ovarian epithelial tumours: a preliminary report
    Sahat B.R.E. Matondang, Avrilia Ekawati, Andrijono Andrijono, Hartono Tjahjadi, Joedo Prihartono
    Polish Journal of Radiology.2020; 85: 250.     CrossRef
Review article
Endoscopic features aiding the diagnosis of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma
Byung Sam Park, Si Hyung Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2019;36(2):85-91.   Published online February 26, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00136
  • 10,046 View
  • 213 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The incidence of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is increasing worldwide, but the diagnosis is difficult. Most patients are asymptomatic or complain of nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. As the endoscopic features of gastric MALT lymphoma are variable and nonspecific, the possibility of this condition may be overlooked during esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and it remain undiagnosed. Therefore, this condition needs to be considered when an abnormal mucosa is observed during this procedure. Biopsy performed during endoscopy is the primary diagnostic test, but false negative results are possible; large numbers of samples should be collected from both normal and abnormal mucosae. Endoscopic ultrasonography is useful to assess the depth of invasion and to predict the treatment response. After treatment, follow-up tests are required every 3 months until complete remission is achieved, and annually thereafter. Early diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma is difficult, and its diagnosis and follow-up require wide experience and competent endoscopic technique.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Эндоскопическая семиотика гастритоподобной формы первичных неходжкинских лимфом желудка
    Валерия Витальевна Лозовая, О. А. Малихова, А. О. Туманян
    Clinical Oncohematology.2024; 16(4): 380.     CrossRef
  • Uncommon presentation of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in a 13-year-old girl: acute vomiting of blood as the initial symptom
    Xinyu Jin, Xin Jin, Piao Guo, Linjuan Lu, Weisong Sheng, Danrong Zhu
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2024; 86(5): 3001.     CrossRef
  • Next-Generation-Sequencing of the Human B-Cell Receptor Improves Detection and Diagnosis and Enhances Disease Monitoring in Patients with Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma
    Chidimma Agatha Akpa, Cora Husemann, Chris Allen, Ann-Christin von Brünneck, Jana Ihlow, Michael Hummel
    Journal of Molecular Pathology.2024; 5(3): 292.     CrossRef
  • A rare case of perforated gastric lymphoma presenting a life-threatening condition: A case report
    Mohamed Zayati, Mohamed Ali Chaouch, Ahmed Hadj Taieb, Besma Gafsi, Mehdi Ben Abdelwahed, Faouzi Noomen
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2023; 112: 109010.     CrossRef
  • Development and evaluation of a double-check support system using artificial intelligence in endoscopic screening for gastric cancer
    Hirotaka Oura, Tomoaki Matsumura, Mai Fujie, Tsubasa Ishikawa, Ariki Nagashima, Wataru Shiratori, Mamoru Tokunaga, Tatsuya Kaneko, Yushi Imai, Tsubasa Oike, Yuya Yokoyama, Naoki Akizue, Yuki Ota, Kenichiro Okimoto, Makoto Arai, Yuki Nakagawa, Mari Inada,
    Gastric Cancer.2022; 25(2): 392.     CrossRef
  • Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the terminal ileum: A case report
    Vitor Lauar Pimenta de Figueiredo, Igor Braga Ribeiro, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura, Cristiano Claudino Oliveira, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2022; 14(3): 176.     CrossRef
  • Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the terminal ileum: A case report
    Vitor Lauar Pimenta de Figueiredo, Igor Braga Ribeiro, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux de Moura, Cristiano Claudino Oliveira, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura
    World Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.2022; 14(3): 177.     CrossRef
  • Gastrointestinal Tract Lymphoma
    Ji Yong Ahn
    The Korean Journal of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research.2022; 22(1): 18.     CrossRef
  • Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Masked as Gastric Varices With Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case Report
    David E Jonason, Michael Linden, Guru Trikudanathan
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Endoscopic submucosal dissection for protruding Helicobacter pylori-negative mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of the stomach: a case report
    Mayuko Seya, Osamu Dohi, Katsuma Yamauchi, Hayato Fukui, Hajime Miyazaki, Takeshi Yasuda, Ken Inoue, Naohisa Yoshida, Yukiko Morinaga, Yoshito Itoh
    Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology.2022; 15(5): 881.     CrossRef
  • Multimodality imaging findings of infection-induced tumors
    Moataz Soliman, Nicholas Guys, Peter Liu, Mariam Moshiri, Christine O. Menias, Vincent M. Mellnick, Hatice Savas, Mohamed Badawy, Khaled M. Elsayes, Ayman H. Gaballah
    Abdominal Radiology.2022; 47(11): 3930.     CrossRef
  • Does endoscopic submucosal dissection have its place in the treatment of patients with gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma localized disease after eradication?
    Y Li, Z Wang, X Zhang, J Yang
    Acta Gastro Enterologica Belgica.2022; 85(2): 410.     CrossRef
  • Multiple Synchronous Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Lymphomas Involving in the Stomach, Duodenum, Ileum, and Sigmoid
    Chun-Wei Chen, Yang-Yuan Chen, Yung-Fang Chen
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(12): 3150.     CrossRef
  • Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas Diagnosed by Jumbo Biopsy Using Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection: A Case Report
    Jian Han, Jun Wang, Hua-ping Xie
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pedunculated mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma causing gastric outlet obstruction
    Elena Resina Sierra, Pablo Miranda García, Magdalena Adrados, Cecilio Santander Vaquero
    Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Primary mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the bladder from an imaging perspective: A case report
    Zhen-Zhen Jiang, Yuan-Yuan Zheng, Chuan-Ling Hou, Xia-Tian Liu
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2021; 9(32): 10024.     CrossRef
Case Report
Double primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed by epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status
Oh Jung Kwon, Min Hyeok Lee, Sung Ju Kang, Seul Gi Kim, In Beom Jeong, Ji Yun Jeong, Eun Jung Cha, Do Yeun Cho, Young Jin Kim, Ji Woong Son
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(2):270-274.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.2.270
  • 2,139 View
  • 11 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A nodular density was detected on a chest radiograph taken from a 57-year-old Korean woman who was visiting a hospital for a routine check. Chest computed tomography revealed a 4.8 cm lobulated mass in the right lung and another focal nodular lesion in the left lung; biopsies of both lungs revealed adenocarcinoma. We conducted DNA sequencing and peptide nucleic acid clamping to investigate the potential double primary lung cancer. The results verified that the mass in the right lung had a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor, whereas the nodule in the left lung had a wild-type sequence, showing that these two were genetically different cancers from one another. Thus, we demonstrate that genetic testing is useful in determining double primary lung cancer, and we herein report on this case.
Original Article
Clinical courses and diagnoses of neonates who are transferred due to mild respiratory distress soon after birth in a university hospital.
Jee Hyue Seo, Kyo Ho Lee, Eun Sil Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2014;31(2):89-93.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2014.31.2.89
  • 1,927 View
  • 12 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study was conducted to investigate the epidemiological features, clinical courses, and diagnoses of neonates who are transferred to neonatal intensive care unit of Yeungnam University Hospital due to tachypnea soon after birth. METHODS: Based on medical records, we performed a retrospective study of neonatal intensive care unit admissions due to tachypnea from January 2010 to December 2013. RESULTS: A total of 311 neonates were included in this study. The patient characteristics showed male predominance at 2.65:1. Among the 311 neonates with tachypnea, 127 (40.8%) neonates needed oxygen supply, and 54 (17.4%) neonates needed assisted mechanical ventilation. Transient tachypnea of the newborns (TTN) (158, 50.8%) showed the highest incidence, followed by pneumonia (63, 20.3%), extrapulmonary infection (37, 11.9%), respiratory distress syndrome (21, 6.8%), air leak (16, 5.1%), meconium aspiration syndrome (12, 3.9%), congenital heart disease (5, 1.6%), metabolic acidosis (3, 1%), primary pulmonary hypertension of newborns (2, 0.6%) and anemia (2, 0.6%). CONCLUSION: Although the neonates with tachypnea showed no other respiratory distress symptom, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of other pulmonary diseases as well as TTN and their extra-pulmonary causes. If tachypnea does not improve within a few hours, the clinician should consider further evaluation and management as soon as possible.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science