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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Review article
Pediatric headache: a narrative review
Saeyoon Kim
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(4):278-284.   Published online September 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00528
  • 4,244 View
  • 134 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Headache is one of the most common neurological disorders in children and adults and can cause significant distress and disability in children and their families. The spectrum of pediatric headaches is broad, and the underlying etiology is variable. The symptoms and phenotypes of headaches in children may differ slightly from those in adults. It is important to have a good understanding of headaches in children and to distinguish between primary and secondary headaches through appropriate history assessment and neurological examination. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate drug selection are helpful for effective treatment. This article reviews headaches in children and adolescents, focusing on approaches for diagnosis and management.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exploring downstream effects of gender roles in healthcare decision-making and relationships within systems: A cross-sectional analysis of openness to treatment in pediatric headache
    Zoë Schefter, Allison M. Smith
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research.2024; 179: 111611.     CrossRef
  • Occipital nerve stimulation in pediatric patients with refractory occipital neuralgia
    James Mossner, Nour B. Saleh, Maryam N. Shahin, Joshua M. Rosenow, Jeffrey S. Raskin
    Child's Nervous System.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multivariate prediction of long COVID headache in adolescents using gray matter structural MRI features
    Minhoe Kim, Sunkyung Sim, Jaeseok Yang, Minchul Kim
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original article
Pediatricians’ perception of factors concerning the clinical application of blockchain technology to pediatric health care: a questionnaire survey
Yong Sauk Hau, Min Cheol Chang, Jae Chan Park, Young Joo Lee, Seong Su Kim, Jae Min Lee
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(2):156-163.   Published online July 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00241
  • 3,161 View
  • 67 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Interest in digital medical information has increased because it allows doctors to easily access a patient’s medical records and provide appropriate medical care. Blockchain technology ensures data safety, reliability, integrity, and transparency by distributing medical data to all users over a peer-to-peer network. This study attempted to assess pediatricians’ thoughts and attitudes toward introducing blockchain technology into the medical field.
Methods
This study used a questionnaire survey to examine the thoughts and attitudes of 30- to 60-year-old pediatricians regarding the introduction of blockchain technology into the medical field. Responses to each item were recorded on a scale ranging from 1 (never agree) to 7 (completely agree).
Results
The scores for the intentions and expectations of using blockchain technology were 4.0 to 4.6. Pediatricians from tertiary hospitals responded more positively (4.5–4.9) to the idea of using blockchain technology for hospital work relative to the general population (4.3–4.7). However, pediatricians working in primary and secondary hospitals had a slightly negative view of the application of blockchain technology to hospital work (p=0.018).
Conclusion
When introducing the medical records of related pediatric and adolescent patients using blockchain technology in the future, it would be better to conduct a pilot project that prioritizes pediatricians in tertiary hospitals. The cost, policy, and market participants’ perceptions are essential factors to consider when introducing technology in the medical field.
Review article
Drug selection for sedation and general anesthesia in children undergoing ambulatory magnetic resonance imaging
Sung Mee Jung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(3):159-168.   Published online April 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00171
  • 12,325 View
  • 386 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The demand for drug-induced sedation for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have substantially increased in response to increases in MRI utilization and growing interest in anxiety in children. Understanding the pharmacologic options for deep sedation and general anesthesia in an MRI environment is essential to achieve immobility for the successful completion of the procedure and ensure rapid and safe discharge of children undergoing ambulatory MRI. For painless diagnostic MRI, a single sedative/anesthetic agent without analgesia is safer than a combination of multiple sedatives. The traditional drugs, such as chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, midazolam, and ketamine, are still used due to the ease of administration despite low sedation success rate, prolonged recovery, and significant adverse events. Currently, dexmedetomidine, with respiratory drive preservation, and propofol, with high effectiveness and rapid recovery, are preferred for children undergoing ambulatory MRI. General anesthesia using propofol or sevoflurane can also provide predictable rapid time to readiness and scan times in infant or children with comorbidities. The selection of appropriate drugs as well as sufficient monitoring equipment are vital for effective and safe sedation and anesthesia for ambulatory pediatric MRI.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prioritisation of data-poor pharmaceuticals for empirical testing and environmental risk assessment
    Cristiana Cannata, Thomas Backhaus, Irene Bramke, Maria Caraman, Anna Lombardo, Rhys Whomsley, Caroline T.A. Moermond, Ad M.J. Ragas
    Environment International.2024; 183: 108379.     CrossRef
  • Review of pediatric sedation and anesthesia for radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
    Mohammed Ageel
    Journal of Radiation Research and Applied Sciences.2024; 17(1): 100833.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of airway collapsibility following single induction dose ketamine with propofol versus propofol sedation in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging: A randomised controlled study
    Pooja Bhardwaj, Sakthirajan Panneerselvam, Priya Rudingwa, Kirthiha Govindaraj, M.V.S. Satya Prakash, Ashok S. Badhe, Krishnan Nagarajan
    Indian Journal of Anaesthesia.2024; 68(2): 189.     CrossRef
  • Evaluating Sedation Strategies for Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Review of Intravenous Fentanyl, Butorphanol, and Midazolam in Adult and Pediatric Populations
    Neeta Verma, Janhavi S Dahake
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and Safety of Dexmedetomidine Compared to Other Needle-Free Pharmacological Sedation Methods in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Imaging Procedures
    Mohammed Alsabri Hussein Alsabri, Abdelrahman Abdelshafi, Ahmed Bostamy Elsnhory, Noha S. amir Ahmed, Alaa Bostamy Elsnhory, Douaa Albelal, Fatima Ikram
    Pediatric Emergency Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adverse events and sedation characteristics of propofol and dexmedetomidine during magnetic resonance imaging: An observational study in neuropsychiatric population
    Shyamala Narayanan, Sriganesh Kamath, Dhritiman Chakrabarti
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice.2024; 0: 1.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of oral triclofos and intranasal midazolam and dexmedetomidine for sedation in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): an open-label, three-arm, randomized trial
    Shyam Chandrasekar, Bhagirathi Dwibedi, Rashmi Ranjan Das, Biswa Mohan Padhy, Bikram Kishore Behera
    European Journal of Pediatrics.2023; 182(3): 1385.     CrossRef
  • Correlation between the actual sleep time 24 hours prior to an examination and the time to achieve chloral hydrate sedation in pediatric patients in South Korea: a prospective cohort study
    Mijung Park, Ji Um, So Hyun Kim, Jiseon Yoon, Yeonjae Lee, Jiyeong Kwon, Seonhee Baek, Dong Yeon Kim
    Child Health Nursing Research.2023; 29(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • COMPARISON OF INTRAMUSCULAR VERSUS INTRAVENOUS KETAMINE FOR SEDATION IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EXAMINATION
    Jasim M. Salman, Jasim N. Al-Asadi, Husham H. Abdul-Ra’aoof, Jawad H. Ahmed, Ali H Reshak
    Wiadomości Lekarskie.2023; 76(1): 198.     CrossRef
  • Does sevoflurane sedation in pediatric patients lead to “pseudo” leptomeningeal enhancement in the brain on 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging?
    Kiran Hilal, Kumail Khandwala, Saima Rashid, Faheemullah Khan, Shayan Sirat Maheen Anwar
    World Journal of Radiology.2023; 15(4): 127.     CrossRef
  • Intranasal dexmedetomidine versus intranasal midazolam as sole sedative agents for pelviabdominal magnetic resonance imaging in pediatrics: A randomized double-blind trial
    TaysserM Abdelraheem, HamdyA Hendawy, AmiraM Elkeblawy
    Bali Journal of Anesthesiology.2023; 7(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, phase 3 clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of intranasal dexmedetomidine to oral midazolam as premedication for propofol sedation in pediatric patients undergoing magnet
    Olivia Nzungu Wabelo, Denis Schmartz, Mario Giancursio, Françoise De Pooter, Giulia Caruso, Jean-François Fils, Philippe Van der Linden
    Trials.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of age on outpatient pediatric procedural sedation with intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral midazolam
    Xiaqing Zhou, Jialian Zhao, Haiya Tu, Kunwei Chen, Yaoqin Hu, Yue Jin
    European Journal of Pediatrics.2023; 183(1): 169.     CrossRef
  • Determination of the normal conus medullaris level in term infants: the role of MRI in early infancy
    Mengchun Sun, Benzhang Tao, Gan Gao, Hui Wang, Aijia Shang
    Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.2022; 29(1): 100.     CrossRef
  • Patient background related to success and adverse event in pediatric sedated MRI
    Yutaka Konda, Hajime Mihira, Louis Akiyama, Yuki Shiko, Yoshihito Ozawa, Yohei Kawasaki, Katsunori Fujii, Ryugo Hiramoto
    Pediatrics International.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Risk Factors for Chloral Hydrate Sedative Failure with Initial Dose in Pediatric Patients: a Retrospective Analysis
    Yu Cui, Langtao Guo, Qixia Mu, Lu Kang, Qin Chen, Qunying Wu, Yani He, Min Tang
    Pediatric Drugs.2022; 24(4): 403.     CrossRef
  • Using intranasal dexmedetomidine with buccal midazolam for magnetic resonance imaging sedation in children: A single-arm prospective interventional study
    Bi Lian Li, Hao Luo, Jun Xiang Huang, Huan Huan Zhang, Joanna R. Paquin, Vivian M. Yuen, Xing Rong Song
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Novel Propofol Dosing Regimen for Pediatric Sedation during Radiologic Tests
    Ji-Young Min, Jeong-Rim Lee, Hye-Mi Lee, Ho-Jae Nam, Hyo-Jin Byon
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(17): 5076.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric outcomes following ketamine administration for orthopedic surgical anesthesia
    Alec E. Mansour, Elijah W. Hale, Daniel S. Saks
    Frontiers in Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Artificial intelligence in paediatric radiology: Future opportunities
    Natasha Davendralingam, Neil J Sebire, Owen J Arthurs, Susan C Shelmerdine
    The British Journal of Radiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Statistical analysis of patients referred to pediatric cardiologic clinic for diagosis of heart disease.
Kwang Hae Choi, Young Hwan Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2000;17(1):49-54.   Published online June 30, 2000
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2000.17.1.49
  • 1,623 View
  • 2 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Echocardiography is rapidly established itself as the primary diagnostic technique for investigation of children with heart disease, and referrals are increasing to the pediatric cardiology clinic for investigation. However, because there is a lack of analysis data on the patients referred to pediatric cardiology clinics, we have proceeded to compare and analyze their characteristics to provide basic data base. METHODS: From Oct. 1, 1998 to Jul. 10, 1999, total 443 cases referred to the pediatric cardiology clinic of Yeungnam University Hospital were studied retrospectively by medical records, chest X-ray, EKG and echocardiography, etc. RESULTS: The results were as follows. 1. The proportion of male was 61.0%(261 cases) and that of female was 39.0%(167 cases). The ratio of male to female was 1.6:1. The proportion infants less than 1 year-old was 62.6%(268 cases) of all patients. 2. Cardiac murmur was present in 248 cases(57.9%), which was the most common case of referral to the pediatric cardiology clinic. The impression at referral was more congenital heart disease(70.6%) than acquired heart disease(17.8%) and arrhythmia(11.6%). 3. The final diagnosis was as follows : congenital heart disease was present in 212 cases(49.5%), acquired heart disease, 59 cases(13.9%); arrhythmia, 13 cases(3.0%); normal heart, 144 cases(33.6%). CONCLUSION: Among the patients referred to pediatric cardiology clinic, 33.6%(144 cases) had normal hearts and why these patient were referred may be possibly due to more dependence on echocardiography than on auscultation instruction. Threfore, clinical and auscultatory skill should be emphasized to minimize dependence on expensive echocardiography for evaluation of pediatric heart disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation and diagnostic approach for heart murmurs in children
    Hee Joung Choi
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2020; 63(7): 398.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science