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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Mathieu Boudier-Revéret 6 Articles
Differential diagnosis of suddenly developed motor weakness in bilateral lower extremities of a 79-year-old male patient
Seong Yeob Kwak, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Min Cheol Chang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):457-460.   Published online January 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00787
  • 859 View
  • 49 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
A 40-year-old man with neuropathic pain in the entire left foot
Jae Hwa Bae, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Min Cheol Chang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(2):223-224.   Published online August 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00486
  • 1,230 View
  • 59 Download
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Tarsal tunnel syndrome due to talocalcaneal coalition
Chul Hyun Park, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Min Cheol Chang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(1):106-108.   Published online October 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01473
  • 3,425 View
  • 139 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Deep-Learning Algorithms for Prescribing Insoles to Patients with Foot Pain
    Jeoung Kun Kim, Yoo Jin Choo, In Sik Park, Jin-Woo Choi, Donghwi Park, Min Cheol Chang
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(4): 2208.     CrossRef
The pros and cons of entry restrictions: are entry restrictions really effective in preventing the spread of SARS-CoV-2?
Donghwi Park, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Min Cheol Chang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(4):344-346.   Published online January 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01599
  • 3,198 View
  • 85 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly spread worldwide, leading the World Health Organization to declare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic. To curb the unchecked spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection, most countries have enforced travel restrictions. However, it is debatable whether such restrictions are effective in containing infections and preventing pandemics. Rather, they may negatively impact economies and diplomatic relationships. Each government should conduct an extensive and appropriate analysis of its national economy, diplomatic status, and COVID-19 preparedness to decide whether it is best to restrict entering travelers. Even if travelers from other countries are allowed entry, extensive contact tracing is required to prevent the spread of COVID-19. In addition, governments can implement “travel bubbles,” which allow the quarantine-free flow of people among countries with relatively low levels of community transmission. An accurate evaluation of the benefits and losses due to entry restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic would be helpful in determining whether entry restrictions are an effective measure to reduce the spread of infection in future pandemics.

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  • “Exceptionally challenging time for all of us”: Qualitative study of the COVID-19 experiences of partners of diplomatic personnel
    Samantha K. Brooks, Dipti Patel, Neil Greenberg, Joseph Adu
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(11): e0293557.     CrossRef
Playing snakes and ladders with the common fibular nerve on ultrasound after knee dislocation
Natan Bensoussan, Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Johan Michaud
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(3):266-267.   Published online September 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01389
  • 3,433 View
  • 87 Download
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Serotonin syndrome in a patient with chronic pain taking analgesic drugs mistaken for psychogenic nonepileptic seizure: a case report
Mathieu Boudier-Revéret, Min Cheol Chang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(4):371-373.   Published online April 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.00948
  • 4,855 View
  • 201 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition that is caused by the administration of drugs that increase serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. We report a case of serotonin syndrome in a patient with chronic pain who was taking analgesic drugs. A 36-year-old female with chronic pain in the lower back and right buttock area had been taking tramadol hydrochloride 187.5 mg, acetaminophen 325 mg, pregabalin 150 mg, duloxetine 60 mg, and triazolam 0.25 mg daily for several months. After amitriptyline 10 mg was added to achieve better pain control, the patient developed SS, which was mistaken for psychogenic nonepileptic seizure. However, her symptoms completely disappeared after discontinuation of the drugs that were thought to trigger SS and subsequent hydration with normal saline. Various drugs that can increase serotonergic activity are being widely prescribed for patients with chronic pain. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for the occurrence of SS when prescribing pain medications to patients with chronic pain.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science