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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Seong-Ho Kim 3 Articles
Neurosurgical Treatment for Cerebral Palsy Spasticity
Seong-Ho Kim, Byung-Yon Choi
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2 Suppl):S186-191.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2S.S186
  • 1,195 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The spasticity of cerebral palsy is usually a useful substitute for deficiency of motor strength. However not infrequently, it may become harmful leading to an aggravation of motor disability. When excessive spasticity is not sufficiently controlled by physical therapy and pharmacological treatment, patients can have recourse to neurosurgery: neurostimulation, intrathecal baclofen or selective ablative procedures. Because excessive hypertonia has to be reduced without suppression of the useful muscular tone or impairment in the residual motor and sensory functions, neuroablative procedures must be as selective as possible. These selective lesions can be performed at the level of peripheral nerves, spinal roots, or the dorsal root entry zone(DREZotomy). The new neurological status brought about by the neurosurgical operation will reach its optimal level only if intensive, prolonged, comprehensive treatment is provided by an expert multidisciplinary team including rehabilitation medicine. The neurosurgical treatment must take place before the onset of irreversible articular disturbances and musculotendinous retractions, which require complementary orthopedic corrections.
Nondestructive Neuroaugmentative Surgery for Intractable Cancer Pain
Seong-Ho Kim, Byung-Yon Choi, Soo-Ho Cho
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2 Suppl):S192-202.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2S.S192
  • 1,122 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pain is probably one of the most common cancer symptoms. In addition to being a major source of suffering and disability, cancer pain is extremely frightening for patients and their families. The authors propose to adjust the World Health Organization (WHO) pain management ladder from its current three-step approach to a more sophisticated five-step algorithm that includes physical and psychological modalities along the entire continuum of care and adds two more steps related to neuromodulative and neurodestructive procedures once the opioids fail. This review discusses the current surgical options for treating cancer pain, focusing on the continuous drug infusion pump currently available and briefly exploring some of the other surgical options for pain management. The introduction of intrathecal opioid administration for intractable cancer pain is considered as one of the most important breakthroughs in pain management. Morphine, the only opioid approved by FDA for intrathecal administration, has been increasingly utilized for this purpose.
Anatomy of Low Back Pain
Seong-Ho Kim, Soo-Ho Cho
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2 Suppl):S203-211.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2S.S203
  • 1,267 View
  • 27 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The sinuvertebral nerve(SVN) supplies the laterodorsal outer annulus of the intervertebral disc, the posterior longitudinal ligament(PLL), the anterior 2/3 of the dural sac and the anterior vascular plexus. Many blood vessels pass through the lateral neural canal: the anterior and posterior spinal canal branches, anterior and posterior radicular branches, and veins of the anterior and posterior internal vertebral venous plexus. The PLL is assumed to play an important role in proprio- and nociception. In the neighborhood of the SVN, other small branches emanate from the rami communicantes and join the dorsal ramus and the segmental artery that enters the neural canal. The sympathetic nerve plexus inside the anterior longitudinal ligament and the SVNs provide a network of nerve fibers around the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs. These pathways explain the sympathetic component of the innervation of a number of spinal structures. The dorsal ramus innervates the facet joints at the corresponding level and one below, before it gives off muscular and cutaneous branches.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Protocol for Ultrasound-guided Acupotomy Procedure at Ligament Flavum
    Kyungho Kang, Kichang Oh, Jaehyo Kim, Hongmin Chu
    Journal of Korean Medical Society of Acupotomology.2023; 7(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Low Back Pain and Depression Among Some Elderly
    Seong-Woo Yun, Kyeong-Ae Oh
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(3): 1599.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science