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21 "Ultrasonography"
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Original articles
Optimal examination for traumatic nerve/muscle injuries in earthquake survivors: a retrospective observational study
Berkay Yalçınkaya, Büşranur Tüten Sağ, Mahmud Fazıl Aksakal, Pelin Analay, Hasan Ocak, Murat Kara, Bayram Kaymak, Levent Özçakar
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2024;41(2):120-127.   Published online April 5, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2024.00087
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Physiatrists are facing with survivors from disasters in both the acute and chronic phases of muscle and nerve injuries. Similar to many other clinical conditions, neuromusculoskeletal ultrasound can play a key role in the management of such cases (with various muscle/nerve injuries) as well. Accordingly, in this article, a recent single-center experience after the Turkey-Syria earthquake will be rendered.
Methods
Ultrasound examinations were performed for various nerve/muscle lesions in 52 earthquake victims referred from different cities. Demographic features, type of injuries, and applied treatment procedures as well as detailed ultrasonographic findings are illustrated.
Results
Of the 52 patients, 19 had incomplete peripheral nerve lesions of the brachial plexus (n=4), lumbosacral plexus (n=1), and upper and lower limbs (n=14).
Conclusion
The ultrasonographic approach during disaster relief is paramount as regards subacute and chronic phases of rehabilitation. Considering technological advances (e.g., portable machines), the use of on-site ultrasound examination in the (very) early phases of disaster response also needs to be on the agenda of medical personnel.
Rates and subsequent clinical course of fetal congenital anomalies detected by prenatal targeted ultrasonography of 137 cases over 5 years in a single institute: a retrospective observational study
Haewon Choi, Hyo-Shin Kim, Joon Sakong
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(3):268-275.   Published online November 2, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00514
  • 1,490 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
With the establishment of international guidelines and changes in insurance policies in Korea, the role of targeted ultrasonography has increased. This study aimed to identify the rates and clinical course of anomalies detected using prenatal targeted ultrasonography.
Methods
This study was a retrospective analysis of all pregnancies with targeted ultrasonography performed in a single secondary medical center over 5 years.
Results
Fetal anomalies were detected by targeted ultrasonography in 137 of the 8,147 cases (1.7%). The rates of anomalies were significantly higher in female fetuses (2.0% vs. 1.3%). In cases of female fetuses, the rate of anomalies was significantly higher in the advanced maternal age group (2.4% vs. 1.2%). In cases of male fetuses, the rate of anomalies was significantly higher in nulliparous (2.4% vs. 1.5%) and twin (5.7% vs. 1.9%) pregnancies. Pulmonary anomalies were significantly more common in the multiparity group (17.6% vs. 5.8%). Among the 137 cases, 17.5% terminated the pregnancy, 16.8% were diagnosed as normal after birth, and 42.3% were diagnosed with anomalies after birth or required follow-up.
Conclusion
Through the first study on the rates and clinical course of anomalies detected by targeted ultrasonography at a single secondary center in Korea, we found that artificial abortions were performed at a high rate, even for relatively mild anomalies or anomalies with good prognosis. We suggest the necessity of a nationwide study to establish clinical guidelines based on actual incidences or prognoses.
Assessment of normal anal sphincter anatomy using transanal ultrasonography in healthy Korean volunteers: a retrospective observational study
Daeho Shon, Sohyun Kim, Sung Il Kang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(3):230-234.   Published online December 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01515
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
To date, there have been no studies on the normal anatomic values of the anal sphincter in healthy Koreans. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the normal anatomic values of transanal ultrasonography (TAUS).
Methods
The thickness of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) was measured by TAUS from healthy Korean volunteers between September 2019 and August 2021.
Results
Thirty-six volunteers with a median age of 37 years (range, 20–77 years) and a median body mass index (BMI) of 23.5 kg/m2 (range, 17.2–31.2 kg/m2) were examined. The median thickness of the EAS at 4 cm and 2 cm from the anal verge was 7.4 mm (range, 5.8–8.8 mm) and 6.5 mm (range, 5.6–8.0 mm), respectively. The median thickness of the IAS at 2 cm from the anal verge was 1.8 mm (range, 0.8-4.3 mm). There were no differences in sphincter muscle thickness between the sexes. However, the EAS tended to thicken as the BMI increased (EAS at 2 cm and 4 cm from the anal verge, Spearman rho=0.433, 0.363; p=0.008 and p=0.029, respectively).
Conclusion
In healthy Korean, the median thickness of the IAS at 2 cm from the anal verge was 1.8 mm and the median thickness of the EAS at 2 cm and 4 cm from the anal verge was 6.5 mm and 7.4 mm respectively. There were no differences in anal sphincter thickness between sexes, but BMI was related to EAS thickness.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Anal Sphincter Defect and Fecal Incontinence
    Sherief Mansi, Karla Vaz, Neha R. Santucci, Khalil El-Chammas, Kahleb Graham, Nelson G. Rosen, Ajay Kaul
    JPGN Reports.2022; 3(4): e254.     CrossRef
Case report
Anesthetic management during whole-lung lavage using lung ultrasound in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case report
Jae Wan Jung, Hyunho Lee, Jimi Oh
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(4):374-380.   Published online September 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01284
  • 3,971 View
  • 98 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is an uncommon disease characterized by progressive accumulation of lipoprotein material in the lungs due to impaired surfactant clearance. Whole-lung lavage (WLL) is the current standard treatment and consists of sequential lavage of each lung to mechanically remove the residual material from the alveoli. Although WLL is considered safe, unexpected complications can occur. Moreover, due to the rarity of the disease itself, this procedure is unknown to many physicians, and management of intraoperative complications can be challenging for anesthesiologists. Lung ultrasound (LUS) provides reliable and valuable information for detecting perioperative pulmonary complications and, in particular, quantitation of lung water content. There have been reports on monitoring the different stages of controlled deaeration of the non-ventilated lung during WLL using LUS. However, it has been limited to non-ventilated lungs. Therefore, we report the use of LUS in WLL to proactively detect pulmonary edema in the ventilated lung and implement a safe and effective anesthesia strategy. Given the limited diagnostic tools available to anesthesiologists in the operating room, LUS is a reliable, fast, and noninvasive method for identifying perioperative pulmonary complications in patients with PAP undergoing WLL.
Original article
Puncture needle with a hard plastic sheath and plastic wings minimizes repuncture attempts in ultrasound-guided paracentesis: a retrospective case-control study
Il Wan Son, Suk Kim, Seung Baek Hong, Nam Kyung Lee, Mi Ri Jeong, Sung Yong Han, Hyun Young Woo
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(1):18-23.   Published online July 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01109
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study was performed to evaluate periprocedural factors, complications, and repuncture rate of the newly developed puncture needle and compare it with the routinely used puncture needle for ultrasound (US)-guided paracentesis.
Methods
We retrospectively identified 137 patients who underwent US-guided paracentesis between July 2018 and March 2019. Among them, 82 patients underwent US-guided paracentesis with a newly developed puncture needle. The other 55 patients underwent US-guided paracentesis with a routinely used puncture needle. The periprocedural factors, complications, and repuncture rate were compared between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test. The repuncture-associated factors were assessed using logistic regression analysis.
Results
There were no major or minor complications in either group. The rate of repuncture was significantly lower in the group using the newly developed puncture needle compared with the group using the routinely used puncture needle (p=0.01). The duration of the procedure was significantly shorter with the newly developed puncture needle compared with the routinely used puncture needle (p=0.01). In univariate analysis, the thickness of the abdominal wall (p=0.04) and the use of the newly developed puncture needle (p=0.01) were significantly associated with the rate of repuncture. In multivariate analysis, only the use of the newly developed puncture needle was significantly associated with the rate of repuncture.
Conclusion
Using this novel puncture needle with a hard plastic sheath and plastic wings, the rate of repuncture and the duration of the procedure were decreased without complications of US-guided paracentesis.
Case reports
The diagnosis of an imperforate anus in female fetuses
Hyun Mi Kim, Hyun-Hwa Cha, Jong In Kim, Won Joon Seong, Sook-Hyun Park, Mi Ju Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(3):240-244.   Published online October 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00507
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  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Imperforate anus is an anomaly caused by a defect in the development of the hindgut during early pregnancy. It is a relatively common congenital malformation and is more common in males. Although there are cases of a solitary imperforate anus, the condition is more commonly found as a part of a wider spectrum of other congenital anomalies. Although urgent reconstructive anorectal surgery is not necessary, immediate evaluation is important and urgent decompressive surgery may be required. Moreover, as there are often other anomalies that can affect management, prenatal diagnosis can help in optimizing perinatal care and prepare parents through prenatal counseling. In the past, imperforate anus was diagnosed by prenatal ultrasonography based on indirect signs such as bowel dilatation or intraluminal calcified meconium. Currently, it is diagnosed by directly checking the perineum with prenatal ultrasonography. Despite advances in ultrasound technology, accurate prenatal diagnosis is impossible in most cases and imperforate anus is detected after birth. Here, we present two cases of imperforate anus in female fetuses that were not diagnosed prenatally.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ultrasonography guided puncture and dilatation in membranous rectal atresia
    Cunera M.C. de Beaufort, Joep P.M. Derikx, Simon G.F. Robben, Rick R. van Rijn, Ramon R. Gorter, L.W. Ernest van Heurn
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports.2023; 89: 102564.     CrossRef
  • Radiology findings of Down syndrome: a literature review
    Jacobus Jeno Wibisono, Carissa Faustina, Maria Georgina Wibisono, Jeanne Leman, Ratna Sutanto
    Chinese Journal of Academic Radiology.2023; 6(4): 133.     CrossRef
  • Аноректальні аномалії розвитку
    Ольга Антонюк, Василь Пикалюк, Олександр Слободян, Альона Романюк, Людмила Шварц
    Notes in Current Biology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anorectoplasty and external sphincteroplasty via inverted V-shaped incision on the perineum for the treatment of imperforate anus with rectal fistula to navicular fossa: Report of 26 cases
    Da Ma, Yi Wang, Ying-Song Liu
    Asian Journal of Surgery.2022; 45(6): 1313.     CrossRef
  • Challenges in prenatal diagnosis of foetal anorectal malformation and hydrocolpos – Case report
    Muhammad Alamsyah Aziz, Fatima Zahra, Cut ZB Razianti, Nuniek Kharismawati, Tjut Sutjighassani, Nadia Larastri Almira, Kevin Dominique Tjandraprawira
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance images of a gluteus maximus tear
Jong Bum Kim, Wonho Lee, Min Cheol Chang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(2):157-159.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00500
  • 6,453 View
  • 124 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The diagnosis of a gluteal muscle tear or strain is based on clinical findings. However, for an accurate diagnosis, imaging examinations are also needed. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with a gluteus maximus muscle tear confirmed by ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 58-year-old woman complained of dull pain in the left lateral gluteal region that she had been experiencing for 8 days. In the axial US image, retraction of the left gluteus maximus muscle was noted around its insertion site in the iliotibial band. On an MRI, a partial tear in the left gluteus maximus was observed at its insertion site in the left iliotibial band. In addition, fluid infiltration due to edema and hemorrhage was observed. A partial left gluteal muscle tear was diagnosed. The patient was treated with physical therapy at the involved region and oral analgesics. She reported relief from the pain after 1 month of treatment. Based on this experience, we recommend US or MRI for accurate diagnosis of muscle tear or strain.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Essentials of thoracic outlet syndrome: A narrative review
    Min Cheol Chang, Du Hwan Kim
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2021; 9(21): 5804.     CrossRef
  • Obturator hernia - a rare etiology of lateral thigh pain: A case report
    Jun Young Kim, Min Cheol Chang
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2021; 9(34): 10728.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Comparison of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block at 6th and 7th cervical vertebrae using the lateral paracarotid out-of-plane approach for sympathetic blockade in the upper extremity
Jongyoon Baek, Bum Soo Kim, Hwarim Yu, Hyuckgoo Kim, Chaeseok Lim, Sun Ok Song
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(2):199-204.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.2.199
  • 6,119 View
  • 105 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The authors have performed ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (SGB) in our clinic using a lateral paracarotid approach at the level of the 6th cervical vertebra (C6). Although SGB at C6 is a convenient and safe method, there are ongoing concerns about the weak effect of sympathetic blockade in the ipsilateral upper extremity. Therefore, ultrasound-guided SGB was attempted using a lateral paracarotid approach at the level of the 7th cervical vertebra (C7). This prospective study aimed to compare changes in skin temperature after SGB was performed at C6 and C7, and to introduce a lateral paracarotid approach for SGB.
Methods
Thirty patients underwent SGB twice: once at C6 and once at C7. For every SGB, the skin temperature of the patient’s hypothenar area was measured for 15 min at 1-min intervals. Skin temperatures before and after SGB and side effects were compared between C6 and C7 groups.
Results
The temperature of the upper extremity increased after SGB was performed at C6 and C7. There were significant differences between mean pre-SGB and the largest increases in post-SGB temperatures (0.50±0.38℃ and 1.41±0.68℃ at C6 and C7, respectively; p<0.05). Significantly increased post-SGB temperatures (difference >1℃) were found in 5/30 (16.7%) and 24/30 (80%) cases for C6 and C7, respectively (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in side effects between SGB performed at C6 or C7 (p>0.05).
Conclusion
The lateral paracarotid approach using out-of-plane needle insertion for ultrasound-guided SGB performed at C7 was feasible and more effective at elevating skin temperature in the upper extremity than SGB at C6.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The usefulness of stellate ganglion block with ultrasound-guided lateral paracarotid approach in ventricular arrhythmias: A case series
    Hansung Ryu, Hyuckgoo Kim
    Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia.2024; 18(2): 276.     CrossRef
  • Establishment of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block in rats
    Shi-zhu Lin, Lu Chen, Yi-jie Tang, Cheng-jie Zheng, Peng Ke, Meng-nan Chen, Hai-xing Wu, Yu Chen, Liang-cheng Qiu, Xiao-dan Wu, Kai Zeng
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Magnetic resonance imaging validation of medial transthyroid ultrasound‐guided stellate ganglion block: A pilot study
    Boo Young Chung, Christian Holfelder, Robert E. Feldmann, Dieter Kleinboehl, Raoul C. Raum, Justus Benrath
    Pain Practice.2022; 22(3): 329.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged blockade of the cervical sympathetic nerve by stellate ganglion block accelerates therapeutic efficacy in trigeminal neuropathy
    Kazune Kawabata, Teppei Sago, Tsuneto Oowatari, Shunji Shiiba
    Journal of Oral Science.2022; 64(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Comment on an Article by Aleanakian et al. Titled “Effectiveness, Safety, and Predictive Potential in Ultrasound‐Guided Stellate Ganglion Blockades (SGB) for the Treatment of Sympathetically Maintained Pain”
    Pratibha Singh, Anil Agarwal, Chetna Shamshery
    Pain Practice.2021; 21(5): 602.     CrossRef
Ultrasound-guided superficial cervical plexus block under dexmedetomidine sedation versus general anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy: a retrospective pilot study
Wangseok Do, Ah-Reum Cho, Eun-Jung Kim, Hyae-Jin Kim, Eunsoo Kim, Heon-Jeong Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):45-53.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.45
  • 6,541 View
  • 85 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been performed under regional and general anesthesia (GA). The general anesthesia versus local anesthesia for carotid surgery study compared the two techniques and concluded that there was no difference in perioperative outcomes. However, since this trial, new sedative agents have been introduced and devices that improve the delivery of regional anesthesia (RA) have been developed. The primary purpose of this pilot study was to compare intraoperative hemodynamic stability and postoperative outcomes between GA and ultrasound-guided superficial cervical plexus block (UGSCPB) under dexmedetomidine sedation for CEA.
Methods
Medical records from 43 adult patients who underwent CEA were retrospectively reviewed, including 16 in the GA group and 27 in the RA group. GA was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane. The UGSCPB was performed with ropivacaine under dexmedetomidine sedation. We compared the intraoperative requirement for vasoactive drugs, postoperative complications, pain scores using the numerical rating scale, and the duration of hospital stay.
Results
There was no difference between groups in the use of intraoperative antihypertensive drugs. However, intraoperative inotropic and vasopressor agents were more frequently required in the GA group (p<0.0001). In the GA group, pain scores were significantly higher during the first 24 h after surgery (p<0.0001 between 0-6 h, p<0.004 between 6-12 h, and p<0.001 between 12-24 h). The duration of hospital stay was significantly more in the GA group (13.3±4.6 days in the GA group vs. 8.5±2.4 days in the RA group, p<0.001).
Conclusion
In this pilot study, intraoperative hemodynamic stability and postoperative outcomes were better in the RA compared to the GA group.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outcomes of Dexmedetomidine with Local Regional Anesthesia in Carotid Endarterectomy
    Samik H. Patel, Vikram L. Sundararaghavan, Amber M. Pawlikowski, Jeremy Albright, Jason M. Adams, Michael J. Heidenreich, Robert J. Beaulieu, Abdulhameed Aziz
    Annals of Vascular Surgery.2023; 89: 174.     CrossRef
  • Anesthetic Management of a Patient Undergoing Cochlear Implantation With Superficial Cervical Plexus Block and Sedation: A Case Report
    Natsuki Takemura, Tetsuya Miyashita, Yasuko Baba
    A&A Practice.2022; 16(1): e01555.     CrossRef
  • Ultrasound-guided intermediate cervical plexus block for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy under general anesthesia: a case-control study
    Onat BERMEDE, Volkan BAYTAŞ
    Journal of Contemporary Medicine.2022; 12(2): 261.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between annular calcification of plaques in the carotid sinus and perioperative hemodynamic disorder in carotid angioplasty and stenting
    Qingjie Chi, Zhuo Chen, Li Zhu, Ruifan Yuan, Kaixuan Ren, Tianle Wang, Wenbin Ding
    Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.2022; 31(10): 106634.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac output and cerebral blood flow during carotid surgery in regional versus general anesthesia: A prospective randomized controlled study
    Helmuth Tauber, Werner Streif, Jennifer Gebetsberger, Lukas Gasteiger, Eve Pierer, Michael Knoflach, Gustav Fraedrich, Maria Gummerer, Josef Fritz, Corinna Velik-Salchner
    Journal of Vascular Surgery.2021; 74(3): 930.     CrossRef
  • Cerebral and Systemic Stress Parameters in Correlation with Jugulo-Arterial CO2 Gap as a Marker of Cerebral Perfusion during Carotid Endarterectomy
    Zoltán Kovács-Ábrahám, Timea Aczél, Gábor Jancsó, Zoltán Horváth-Szalai, Lajos Nagy, Ildikó Tóth, Bálint Nagy, Tihamér Molnár, Péter Szabó
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(23): 5479.     CrossRef
  • Plexus anesthesia versus general anesthesia in patients for carotid endarterectomy with patch angioplasty: Protocol for a systematic review with meta-analyses and Trial Sequential Analysis of randomized clinical trials
    M. S. Marsman, J. Wetterslev, F. Keus, D. van Aalst, F. G. van Rooij, J. M.M. Heyligers, F. L. Moll, A. Kh. Jahrome, P. W.H.E Vriens, G. G. Koning
    International Journal of Surgery Protocols.2020; 19: 1.     CrossRef
Case Report
Ultrasonographic findings in Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: a thickened or three-layer hepatic capsule
You Ho Moon, Jung ho Kim, Won joon Jeong, Sin-Youl Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):127-129.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.127
  • 5,482 View
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome (FHCS) is characterized by inflammation of the perihepatic capsules associated with the pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). FHCS is not a serious disease, but if not treated properly, it can result in increased medical costs, prolonged treatment, and dissatisfaction with treatment. However, early recognition of FHCS in the emergency department can be difficult because its symptoms or physical findings may mimic many other diseases. Although contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the useful imaging modality for recognition of FHCS, it is available only when a high suspicion is established. We performed point-of-care ultrasonography in an 18-year-old woman who had a sharp right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain without PID symptoms and found a thickened or three-layer hepatic capsule. These findings coincided with areas showing increased hepatic capsular enhancement in the arterial phase of CECT. These results show that if the thickened or three-layer hepatic capsule without evidence of a common cause of RUQ pain is observed on ultrasonography in women of childbearing age with RUQ abdominal pain, the physician can consider the possibility of FHCS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of Misdiagnosis of FHCS Syndrome as Cholecystitis and Literature Review
    旭旗 申
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(06): 5608.     CrossRef
Original Article
Follow-up of thyroid ultrasonography in patients with hemodialysis
Hyun Jung Kim, Bo Ra Kim, Yeong Mi Seo, Yoon Young Cho, Jong Ha Baek, Kyong Young Kim, Soo Kyung Kim, Seung Hoon Woo, Jung Hwa Jung, Jaehoon Jung, Jong Ryeal Hahm
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(1):69-74.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.1.69
  • 2,061 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Chronic kidney disease is considered a risk factor for thyroid nodules as well as thyroid dysfunction such as hypothyroidism. Among patients on hemodialysis, we assessed the size of thyroid nodule and goiter at baseline and 1 year later with ultrasonography. METHODS: We prospectively selected 47 patients with hemodialysis at January 2012 and reviewed their medical records. We checked goiter and thyroid nodules at January 2012 and December 2012. RESULTS: In the hemodialysis patients (n=47), 24 patients (51.1%) had thyroid nodules and 33 patients (70.2%) had goiter at baseline. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) was higher in patients with thyroid nodules (204.4±102.9 vs. 129.9±93.6 pg/mL, p=0.01). Thyroid ultrasonography was conducted in 29 patients after 1 year. The thickness of the thyroid isthmus increased (2.8±1.6 vs. 3.2±1.9 mm, p=0.003), but the number of nodules did not change (1.2±1.9 vs. 1.4±2.0, p=0.109). PTH was associated with the enlargement of thyroid nodules significantly through logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: Thyroid goiter and nodules in hemodialysis patients were more prevalent than in the general population. PTH influenced the production of thyroid nodules in hemodialysis patients. Regular examination with thyroid ultrasonography and thyroid function test should be considered in hemodialysis patients.
Review
The roles of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary cancer.
Kook Hyun Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2016;33(2):77-84.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2016.33.2.77
  • 1,934 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pancreatic cancer, the 4th leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, has a very poor prognosis. Cholangiocarcinoma originates from either intrahepatic or extrahepatic bile duct, and its incidence is gradually increasing worldwide. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with brush cytology has a high false-negative rate for the diagnosis of biliary malignancy. Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has emerged as the potential modality to detect pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration for cytologic analysis made it possible to overcome the obstacle in differentiating between benign and malignant lesions in the pancreatobiliary lesion, and it has been well established as a safe and effective procedure. Herein, the clinical application of EUS in the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary cancer was reviewed.
Original Articles
Ultrasonographic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Testicular Lymphoma.
Jae Ho Cho
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2010;27(2):105-112.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2010.27.2.105
  • 1,577 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE: To evaluate the specific radiologic findings of testicular lymphoma which will be able to differentiated from other testicular tumors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pathologically confirmed eight cases were included in this study. All eight cases were performed ultrasonography and four cases were performed magnetic resonance image. On ultrasonography, the size, location, shape, margin, internal echogenicity, homogeneity and vascularity were evaluated. On magnetic resonance image, the shape, margin, homogeneity, signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images, degree and homogeneity of the contrast enhancement and contrast enhancement change on dynamic enhancement study. RESULTS: The margin of the mass was smooth on 6 of 8 patients. Internal echogenicity of the mass lesion was hypoechoic than normal testicular parenchyme on 7 of 8 patients. Four cases were homogeneous, 3 cases were relatively homogeneous and 1 case was heterogeneous. All 8 cases showed increased vascularity. The mass lesion was iso-signal intensity on T1-weighted image and low-signal intensity on T2-weighted image. All four cases were enhanced homogeneously and mildly than enhancing normal testicular parenchyme. On dynamic enhancement study, the mass lesion is progressively enhanced with time. CONCLUSION: The possibility of testicular lymphoma should be considered when testicular mass was homogeneously hypoechoic and low signal intensity on T2-weighted image in old age patients.
Radiologic Findings of Renal Oncocytomas.
Jae Ho Cho
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2009;26(1):30-37.   Published online June 30, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2009.26.1.30
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AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE: To radiologically differentiate renal oncocytoma from other renal solid tumors, we analyzed and characterized, retrogradely, radiologic findings of renal oncocytomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiologic findings of pathologically proven renal oncocytoma were analyzed in 9 patients. CT was performed in all patients, ultrasonography in 4 patients and MRI in 3 patients. (51) RESULTS: On ultrasonography, the echogenicity of the mass was slightly more hyperechoic than normal renal parenchyma in all 4 cases. Two cases were homogeneous and the remaining two cases were relatively homogeneous. On CT, all 8 cases showed iso-density to slightly low density compared to normal renal parenchyma and 5 cases were homogeneous but the central portion of the mass was of a slightly lower density than the peripheral portion in 3 cases. All six cases had an arterial phase scan and were heterogeneously enhanced. An irregular, lower-enhancing portion was found in the central portion of the mass. Segmental inversion of contrast enhancement was found in 5 of 6 cases that had a dynamic enhancement study. On MR T1-weighted imaging, the mass was of iso-signal intensity to normal renal parenchyma and the central portion of the mass had a slightly hypo-signal intensity than the peripheral portion. On T2-weighted imaging, 2 cases were heterogeneous; the peripheral portion was of low signal intensity and the central portion was of higher signal intensity than normal renal parenchyma. One case was relatively homogeneous and showed a slightly lower signal intensity than that of normal renal parenchyma, except for a central small portion showing high signal intensity. For 2 cases that had a dynamic study, a segmental inversion of contrast enhancement was noted. CONCLUSION: Renal oncocytoma is seen as a well-marginated solid mass lesion. On enhanced scans it is heterogeneously enhanced and segmental inversion of contrast enhancement may be seen. The possibility of oncocytoma can be suggested in cases showing these radiologic findings.
Power Doppler Sonography for the Upper Urinary Tract Infection in Children.
Jung Youn Choi, Jae Ho Cho, Yong Hoon Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):179-185.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.179
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children. The available gold standard methods for diagnosis, Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan and computed tomography (CT) are invasive and expensive. This study was performed to assess the role of power Doppler ultrasound (PDU) for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in 25 children with aged 2 weeks to 5 years who were hospitalized with the first episode of febrile UTI suggesting acute pyelonephritis. All children were examined in the first 3-5 days of admission by PDU and Tc-99m DMSA scan. The comparison between PDU and DMSA scan was performed on the basis of patients. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of PDU for the detection of affected kidneys were 38.1% and 50.0%, and the positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 61.9% and 50.0%, respectively. Vesicoureteral refluxes (VUR) were identified in 11 patients (44.4%) and 18 kidneys (36%). The PDU and DMSA scan showed a matching perfusion defect in 23.8% and 50.0% respectively. CONCLUSION: These data indicate the PDU has a relatively low sensitivity and specificity for differentiating APN from lower UTI but may be a complement tool to DMSA scan for the prediction of VUR in infants and children.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of 99mTc-DMSA Renal Scan and Power Doppler Ultrasonography for the Detection of Acute Pyelonephritis and Vesicoureteral Reflux
    Hee Jung Bae, Yong-Hoon Park, Jae Ho Cho, Kyung Mi Jang
    Childhood Kidney Diseases.2018; 22(2): 47.     CrossRef
  • Urinary tract infections in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia
    Kyoo Hyun Suh, Sun Young Park, Sae Yoon Kim, Jae Min Lee
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2016; 33(2): 105.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science